Textbook Takeoff and Landing Sequence (Nov 8, 2014)

eg: stopmotion, new-york, street
I compiled a set of takeoff and landing segments from a recent flight. These were my best to date and something I try to achieve on every flight. If only they could all be this good!

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15 Comments

  • Henry Trikelife
    by Henry Trikelife 2 years ago
    Beautiful landing, Andrew !!
  • Drew Pawlak
    by Drew Pawlak 2 years ago
    Thanks Henry! I wish they could all be like that! It was a glorious morning and I flew over an hour and a half in some of the calmest conditions I have seen. Wish all days were like that.
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 2 years ago
    Textbook! Well done, Drew.
  • David Reckitt
    by David Reckitt 2 years ago
    Very sweet :). Can i just ask as i am going through training (2 hrs post solo). On take off you push the bar forward from static. I get taught keep neutral (to allow acceleration) and then slowly push bar forward. Are there pro's and cons to either method?
    Thanks
    David
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 2 years ago
    David: what Drew is doing would be more of a soft field takeoff and yours is more of a normal or short field takeoff. Obviously you will accelerate faster with less wing frontal area to relative wind and then pushing the bar will pop you off. This cuts down a few feet in takeoff roll. With soft field you are more concerned with getting light on the wheels as fast as possible.
  • David Reckitt
    by David Reckitt 2 years ago
    Thanks Abid..makes sense :)
  • Bill  Pilgrim
    by Bill Pilgrim 2 years ago
    Holding the bar out without building airspeed first can result in a little instability after takeoff with some wings in some circumstances. I did my initial training at an airfield that is 935 ft amsl. We started in the CFI s 912 powered Cruise wing, and the instruction was to hold the bar out to the compression strut until airborne then immediately back to trim. Half way through my training I purchased a 582 powered Pegasus with q2 wing, first take off with two up we became airborne using the above technique, but as soon as I allowed the bar back to trim we were almost back down trimming the heads off the Daisy's. After that the instruction was to build a bit more airspeed before pushing out :-)
  • Drew Pawlak
    by Drew Pawlak 2 years ago
    Abid: Thanks - 100% Correct about the soft field technique.

    Bill & David: I haven't experienced any instability with my Revo using this technique. It does take some practice and "feel" though to do this right. You can imagine the consequences if you keep the bar pinned to the compression strut too long. Ideally, you want to be pulling the bar back as the front wheel just lifts off the ground, enter ground effect for a second or two and let the trike climb with the bar neutral. Move the bar too early and you extend the takeoff roll. Move it too late and you pop up out of ground effect and have to correct. It's fun and smooth as silk when done right.

    In some of my earlier videos (SOlO in KDYL) you will see several takeoffs where I pull the bar back a bit too late, pop off the runway a bit too high, over correct and actually start back towards the runway to trim the Daisy's before I correct and perform a proper climb out. Takes a little practice but will be helpful eventually when I try flying off grass runways.
  • Bill  Pilgrim
    by Bill Pilgrim 2 years ago
    Drew, you will probably never have a problem with that much power. Things to look out for are, take off weight and density altitude. If you were flying a different trike the power and wing combo have to be considered as well.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 2 years ago
    Believe it or not, if you are doing the soft field takeoff correctly you should be scraping the ground for a few to several seconds after lift off. That is the design of the takeoff. And in a REVO we practice this takeoff at half throttle where the trike will not have enough power to climb away from the ground. And only when the bar has made it back to "neutral" should the trike climb out of ground effect.

    The advantages I see to practicing this type of take off include: consistent lift off at consistent air speed, slower swing through, more skill building for the pilot and controlled climb out angle.

    Holding neutral and then pushing often causes different lift offs if the pilot is not watching the ASI. Also if your trike lifts off before you hit the compression strut, then the speed in which you push the bar forward in combination with the airspeed at which you do it will dictate how abrupt the lift off will be and in all cases the swing through will happen faster giving the pilot less time to bring the bar in before the trike pitches up and leaves ground effect. The slowest swing through will occur when the bar is all the way forward and airspeed increase is responsible for lifting the nose wheel.

    When you master this technique it will be possible lift the nose wheel off at wide open throttle and then ride the mains up to fast cruise speed before lifting off if desired. Besides making for a soft takeoff in a rough field, this will allow control of the pitch up attitude upon take off. However it is NOT (as mentioned already) the shortest takeoff technique. Lastly when don improperly possibly a more dangerous technique for untrained pilots to use. My students are trained and therefore use the technique. Practice practice practice will build tons of skill with this takeoff technique.
  • David Reckitt
    by David Reckitt 2 years ago
    Nice - thanks Drew & Larry - I can see the timing & amount of movement is crucial. Good to know. Will stick to what I am doing now but certainly good to learn a technique in the near future. I have been training on rock hard dirt tracks in Spain and a huge ex WW2 runway in the UK. One day I'll need to get off a boggy field though... :)
  • Drew Pawlak
    by Drew Pawlak 2 years ago
    Larry - "When you master this technique it will be possible lift the nose wheel off at wide open throttle and then ride the mains up to fast cruise speed before lifting off if desired" I am curious - I don't seem to be able do this and I think I am doing the technique correctly. I'm wondering if TO at full power (5600rpm) and in 25F degree temps with density altitudes of -1500 feet (yes that is a minus 1500 feet) is causing that. In these conditions, one up with 8 Gal of gas I've seen my TO climbs in the 1400 ft/min range. I'd love to be able to lift the front and skate the mains along in Ground effect like you suggest. That would be cool.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 2 years ago
    Drew, you have not mastered it yet.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 2 years ago
    Here is an example of 0-100 MPH with full control of the swing through. https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152101506350469
  • Drew Pawlak
    by Drew Pawlak 2 years ago
    Larry - So lets master it in February! :-)
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