Simulated Emergency Landing

eg: stopmotion, new-york, street
I fly an Air Creation Float Trike - Having lost my engine(582) 3 times, all for different reasons, I routinely shut my engine off miles from home to practice hitting a target - Most of the time, while on cross country, I have a small target to hit - arriving too high or too low would have catastrophic results - In this video I practice over one huge landing area, the goal is to hit my mark from miles away, which is right in front of my house - I was inspired by Joe Green and his BS Copter - he was one of the first traffic reporters in the Boston area - He flew from Beverly Airport where I was learning at the time - he routinely shut his engine off and Auto-Rotated in for most landings - If and When it ever happens, it will be routine

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17 Comments

  • Bill Chance
    by Bill Chance 2 years ago
    Thanks Richard for sharing. The wind direction is important. Use the wind to carry the trike to the landing area or being careful to not let the wind carry you past the LZ. Sometimes harder to figure over land but in my area there are numerous small lakes and ponds to look at for wind direction.
  • Scott Williams
    by Scott Williams 2 years ago
    Well done Rich. Great to have stuff like this for understanding the details in practice.
  • Todd Halver
    by Todd Halver 2 years ago
    Rick - great video of this simulated emergency landing. Really helpful to see your planning and execution.
  • Tony  Castillo
    by Tony Castillo 2 years ago
    This is great! thanks... I want a house there too, and floats ... and a 4-stroke. Those can also be turned off for practice engine out.
  • Tom Currier
    by Tom Currier 2 years ago
    Rick has a lot of very nice video's but this is becoming my favorite one. I have yet to try this and just can't bring myself to shut off a perfectly good running engine.
  • jeff trike
    by jeff trike 2 years ago
    LOL. I didn't realize you had a float plane till the last few seconds! I thought you were blowing it pretty badly.
  • John Olson
    by John Olson 2 years ago
    Tom, I'd like to suggest you try hang gliding. I suppose you know that's really what we fly. In your case you might visit Morningside Flight Park in Clairemont. Maybe you already have.
  • Richard Pierce
    by Richard Pierce 2 years ago
    Rotax Guru Rhet Radford lives right at Morningside and just rebuilt my 582 BH - Ace Mechanc
  • Scott Williams
    by Scott Williams 2 years ago
    Totally hear ya Tom! I can't actually shut my engine off either. I'd say all that runway he has on floats makes it a whole lot easier. My 1.5k ft runway looks really small from altitude. lol
  • Tom Currier
    by Tom Currier 2 years ago
    Rick;

    Does he do work on the 912ul 4 stroke? I'm coming up on 6 years for my engine so due for a 5 year maintenance. I guess it calls for replacing hoses, etc.

    Tom

    Thanks,

    Tom
  • Joe Hockman
    by Joe Hockman 2 years ago
    Nice video Richard. My opinion it is VERY important to practice engine off landings. Start in benign conditions when you are on final and know you have the target on runway made. Learn to develop accurate site picture for a preselected target on runway perhaps 1/4 length of runway in from threshold. Slowly practice cutting off engine further back in base leg then in down wind, etc. Always do a self assessment on how you did, closeness to target etc and if you were not happy with what you did then practice it again. When you work up to cutting off engine at 1000 agl or much higher and put it on the money even with cross winds you will develop considerable confidence in your skills that may save you one day when you have a real engine out. Notice I said when and not if because if you fly long enough you will experience this. And the first time it happens for real you will not panic and be extremely thankful that you did practice simulated engine outs. Remember to restrict practice to when there is NO or negligible traffic to deal with and do announce your intentions to minimize chances of surprises. My 2cents. Thanks for sharing Richard.
  • Tom Currier
    by Tom Currier 2 years ago
    Is there a difference going in engine out vs. engine at idle? I have done several engine at idle landings and it's good to know I have power at disposal in case it's needed.
  • white eagle
    by white eagle 2 years ago
    I had an engine out at elk river idaho a few years ago. I spent 3 days practicing my engine outs because the lack of alternate l/zs and very tall trees. On the 4th day while climbing for altitude murphy put me to the test with a real engine out.No panic i went to minimum sink because i didnt want to lose any altitude while acessing my way back to the runway.Once i had my choice of options i went to best glide using (point of destination).I remember calmly saying to myself well iam a hang glider pilot again no problem. When having a engine out (point of destination) should always be one of your tools. If you have a tight lz a quarter of mile away but half a mile is a really good lz.while in your best glidescope look at the better lz and if it is rising to your point of glide you have a poor chance and it would be better to concentrate on the tighter one.But if the better lz is sinking to your point you may want the better l/z. While crossing over the tighter l/z reacess your point if you encounter sink you still have the option of the tighter l/z. Richard good job and good subject.One question is it harder with the xtra drag of floats?
  • Richard Pierce
    by Richard Pierce 2 years ago
    White Eagle - Honestly, it is hard to tell since I have probably done 1100 hours on just floats - My trike is really nimble, I do spirals for fun, chandelles are easy, I can really toss it around at will. That said, I do remember, way back when, those times when I would go back on wheels and it would feel like a helicopter - That was probably more nimble, but any maneuvers I would try in that mode would be at altitude, so it is hard for me to tell how extreme it is, since the ground reference is too far away to judge with. Those of us on floats have a saying, 'Once you go floats you never go back' Of course amphibs are option but the extra weight takes away from the nimbleness.
  • Richard Pierce
    by Richard Pierce 2 years ago
    Tom - Idling is a close second, but misses the point of the exercise - it is a good start though - You will never truly know what the aircraft is capable of until you put it and yourself to the test - it is more psychological thing, giving up your OUTS - On water you have the most forgiving place to practice, runways are everywhere, and your trike is built like a tank, you would have to really work on it to even dent it, for water landings. I cut my engine all the time, I want to know how much altitude I need for any given scenario - My approach in all of them is to maximize glide until I know I have it made, the only thing you can control is rate of descent. You will never truly know until you put yourself to the test - And if you do this long enough it WILL happen, you can't outrun statistics.
  • Jonathan Martin
    by Jonathan Martin 2 years ago
    I have done many engine off landings. The advantage I had was doing them out in the desert where if I came up short or went long, it was all good. What it did teach me was to fly the trike as a glider, (maybe a trike with a failed motor), and get really good and feeling my sink rate, or how to loose altitude fast if I had to get into a tight spot. The engine idling still produces thust. When that engine fails, and they all do, it is so good to be able to say at the moment, "I got this" and just glider her in.
  • Joe Hockman
    by Joe Hockman 2 years ago
    Richard and Jonathan, thanks for chiming in. Your comments were right on Richard. There is a difference between landing at idle vs off, especially if you wish to develop the confidence and skills to deal with any real engine out scenario. But if you have not done it before, do it in baby steps. I have always been amazed at the number of trike pilots I encounter that never practice engine off landings or any sort of simulated emergency landing. Almost all HG aerotow pilots likely had to deal with an instructor that would cut the towline at most any altitude even at 5, 10, 15 without notice. You better know how to react within a split second. As Ole would say, all of us are flying hang gliders and as such thrust should not be a requirement for landing.
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