Engine Failure On Takeoff Emergency Landing Scenarios

eg: stopmotion, new-york, street
three different engine out scenarios on takeoff for trikes. Because it is a long runway and the trike is lightly loaded the altitudes for a turn back to the airport are used. This is not practical for airplanes or less performance trikes. Always seek engine out scenarios with a qualified instructor before attempting, trying, practicing or performing any scenario close to the ground. The ground can break or kill you. The ground sudden stop is very bad. Avoid getting close to the ground.

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38 Comments

  • Tony DeFreece
    by Tony DeFreece 6 years ago
    Very informative. Thanks for sharing, Paul. Thanks in advance for the lives you just saved.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 6 years ago
    Thanks Tony.
    This is above or beyond the normal training procedures but engine out scenarios are one of my favorite challenges to stay in tune in case you get that quiet sound on takeoff.
  • Gregg Ludwig
    by Gregg Ludwig 6 years ago
    For low altitude engine outs, as featured, all you might have time for is the first two (2) steps of the engine out procedure as demonstrated, that is (1) establish a glide, (2) pick a landing area. For engine outs at a higher altitude that allows more time, all of the procedures for an engine out should be completed. Gregg
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 6 years ago
    Thanks Paul for posting this, this has to be one of the best and very practical learning videos for engine outs.
  • Tony DeFreece
    by Tony DeFreece 6 years ago
    @ Paul: When Ole gave me the freedom of flight in 2003, he trained me on engine out. When I later shared a hanger with John Beaman, John dusted me off a time or two and of course, refreshed me on engine out. Last year I experienced my first engine out. With Oly and John's training, I stuck my landing, saving my life and my bird. Your video is another "dust off" for me and improves/reinforces both my knowledge and my chances for a successful outcome to that "quiet sound". Keep the great videos coming. You're making a difference and helping those of us who want to learn.
  • Eric Elbourne
    by Eric Elbourne 6 years ago
    Good stuff Paul, very informative...
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 6 years ago
    FANTASTIC Paul!!! Really great video. Audio in makes a big difference for demonstration.

    Man, I forgot how good those Monsoons with Profi TL's glide.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    12:1
  • Richard LaHood
    by Richard LaHood 6 years ago
    Kudos Paul. Really helpful stuff. I appreciate it.
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 6 years ago
    I have watched this video over and over again. And I absolutely love it. You did a great job Paul by showing different possibilities of putting that bird down. If you have a video on Steep turns, would you kindly upload it too :)
  • Jim Garrett
    by Jim Garrett 6 years ago
    Thank you Paul for an excellent teaching experience. Your attention and discussion during the video was awesome.

    Thank you!
  • Tom  Tabbert
    by Tom Tabbert 6 years ago
    Nothing wrong with landing on Taxi ways?!? - we'll see how the folks up here in the NW feel about that cuz I'll maybe try a few. Great stuff to think about and practice Paul. Not much breathing room on many of the landing stripes I use.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    Nothing wrong with landing on taxiways, airport grass to the side of paved runway etc. In an emergency what they feel does not have any force of law. They can feel hurt and you can play the violin for them
  • jeff trike
    by jeff trike 6 years ago
    Great video.

    Engine out immediately after takeoff at 20 ft AGL, what would you do?

    Jeff
  • Brian Reynolds
    by Brian Reynolds 6 years ago
    Excellent instructional video. I was a bit surprised at you not wearing a helmet.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 6 years ago
    Jeff,
    That is a great question. We have plenty of great pilots and instructors out there. This is an important subject on its own.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 6 years ago
    All pilots/instructors. What would you do if the engine quits 10 or 20 feet off the ground. Or more importantly, how could you prepare for an engine out soon after rotation?
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 6 years ago
    Brian,
    Nice to fly and have your hair in fire. Feeling of freedom.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    @Paul. This in fact already happened to me. That was my very first engine out after about 330 hours of trike flying. Got off the ground about 15 feet and engine quit. Smoothly pulled in but not all the way, and came down to 5 feet. Rounded out and landed like butter. No problem. Biggest pain was to push that Klass Cruise back to the hanger. Bad starter key (ring terminal broken) was the cause .. with alternative engine that required battery through the key to power the ignition coils at all times.
    The main or key factor in that engine out being a non-event was what I was used to doing before the engine out happened. Do not climb out at a steep angle close to the ground. Hence the nose over was quite gentle and not drastic and even 15 feet was enough to grease the landing.
    I have also had the pleasure of having the engine kind of stop 5 feet after takeoff. I say sort of because the engine didn't quit. I shut it off because I had the blonde moment at about 500 hours in Florida winter (yes it was 34 degrees that morning) of taking off my goose feather filled glove and putting it in my lap to set the radio frequency. Well you know how that goes. Just carried on and left one glove (right hand) in my lap and took off. As soon as I got off the ground, prop going with full power and I hear this big "pop". I have no idea what has happened, so I shut the engine and simply land in front. Again since I don't allow to climb low to the ground at a steep angle, it was a non-event. Since that time, I use the pre-takeoff checklist:
    S - Seatbelts
    H - Helmets
    I - Instruments, Radio, Transponder set. Fuel indicator showing enough fuel
    T - Temperature (engine warm up and mag check)

    C - Controls (controls free and clear and look around the wing and hangblock area for abnormalities)
    L - Loose Objects (This means helmet visors down, any gloves or any other items that may have been taken off after starting taxiing are secured again, last chance)
    T - Traffic
  • George Chase
    by George Chase 6 years ago
    Paul, How do you get the audio to be so nice with almost no background noise? When i plug my voice recorder directly into the lynx system i still get lots of engine noise.
  • BYRON  VILLAMARIN
    by BYRON VILLAMARIN 6 years ago
    Thanks Paul for these lessons,
  • Bill  Pilgrim
    by Bill Pilgrim 6 years ago
    Hi Abid, When you say do not climb out at a steep angle do you achieve this by not using full power, holding the bar in a little, or is full power returning the bar to trim as soon as you break ground effect O.K.
    I believe you should get as much air under you asap while maintaining an attitude which is not going to induce a stall should airspeed decrease due to engine failure.
    I think full power and trim is the way to go
    Regards Bill
  • jeff trike
    by jeff trike 6 years ago
    Loss of power immediately after take off has taken many pilots, including Bill Bennett in 2004, a very experienced hang glider pilot. After hearing about these accidents I changed the way I take off. Now as soon as my wheels leave the ground I pull in and keep pulling in to stay in level flight until I have the bar against my belly. If I loose power at anytime, I have the nose level with plenty of excess energy to avoid a stall and land safely. And as an extra bonus, with all that excess speed when I ease the bar out, I do an awesome ZOOM takeoff.

    Unfortunately, I still see too many pilots (usually newbies) push the bar out with their trike held up by the prop and climbing out a high angle of attack. Don't do that.
  • Bill  Pilgrim
    by Bill Pilgrim 6 years ago
    jeff trike said ''Unfortunately, I still see too many pilots (usually newbies) push the bar out with their trike held up by the prop and climbing out a high angle of attack. Don't do that.''
    Hi Jeff, I noticed exactly that in a recent video posted on this site which prompted my post above.
    With regard to pulling the bar in, that's fine if you have a long strip or somewhere to go close to straight ahead but if you are going to get back to the strip or somewhere to the side then altitude is always useful
    Regards Bill
    Regards Bill
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    @Bill I try to always takeoff with full power and control the attitude of the trike with the control bar to keep a lowered attitude close to the ground. I do this unless I have to clear an obstacle in front
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    Yes I saw that in the video of DTA recently posted. Is that what you mean? Not sure but it seems that way. May be its just the camera angle.
  • jeff trike
    by jeff trike 6 years ago
    Abid,
    Great mnemonic for your check list. ;-)
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    @Jeff ... well any man can remember SHIT and CLIT (cut out the I). That's why I used it. Honest. No paper checklist required Hahaha
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 6 years ago
    I use CIGARS for my checklist,

    C- Controls
    I- Ignition (mags test)
    G- Gas (Enough Gas to fly)
    A- Altimeter (caliberation)
    R- Radio test
    S- Seatbelts and Safety (helmet secure)
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    Good old CIGARS misses out too much. Loose objects like the glove I took off to set the radio. What if you have a transponder that needs to be at 1200 and set to Mode C before taking off. What about if you are not flying in boondocks and need to look for TRAFFIC before pulling on to the runway?
    I used to use CIGARS and after a couple of incidents stopped using it and switched to what I use now.
    I guess if you are ok with remembering a number of sub-items under S, it will work for you. But for me I wanted seat-belts, loose objects and traffic divided out separately
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 6 years ago
    Thanks Abid and Jeff for being the only pilot to discuss the engine out at very low altitude 1 to 50 AGL. LOW PITCH ATTITUDE. The "bar in" (plus less throttle if you want and appropiate) will achieve this.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 6 years ago
    I'll add to those comments Paul,

    1) The speed at which the control bar is pulled in is key to getting the nose down.

    2) The bar should not be so far in on climbout that pulling in the bar has little or no pitching moment.
  • Randy Trikeflyer
    by Randy Trikeflyer 6 years ago
    Rizwan
    Bummer about the trike, glad you didn't get hurt (significantly). Did you manage to capture the incident on video???
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    Rizwan, when you have an engine out like the first time, never ever fly the trike back out of the field. Always trailer it and get it thoroughly checked out and after fixing fly-off 5 hours (Phase-I) close to a proper airport (one up) keeping landing sites in mind.
    There are high chances of a mechanic not finding the right cause, the first time unless something is just very obvious
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 6 years ago
    Hi Rizwan. In aviation there can be a lot of peer pressure and when you are new to aviation, you can have a lot of tendency to go along with buds etc. but remember you are the PIC. They can call you afraid, chicken or whatever else .. let them .. at the end of the day you may be home alive with your son while someone else may be hurt. Never fall for what seems stupid. Always take the longer runway when available. Always take-off into the wind when possible. Always land when continuing flight may run you into IMC. Let others continue. I can assure you there is no lack of dumb pilots with small manhood in aviation. Don't follow, lead yourself. Know your boundaries. You have a little son and a wife you have apparently taken to multiple honeymoons to get back to. That must mean that you love her a lot.
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 6 years ago
    Thanks Abid, really valuable advice...you are right, my wife, son and my parents are the most important people in my life and as I gain more experience in aviation I am becoming more careful about the choices I make. Thanks again.
  • jeff trike
    by jeff trike 6 years ago
    Rizwan, What was the cause of either engine out?
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 6 years ago
    Jeff, I couldn't tell you exactly, I am very confident one of my carburater was acting wierd, both times one of my EGT dropped all the way down and trike didn't have enough power to sustain a level flight. The first time it happened the mechanic said it was the carbon buildup in the pistons, so I got it cleaned (that didn't solve the problem). The second time it happened I had engine rebuild and also put brand new carburators, new fuel pump, new fuel lines and since then I never had the problem.

    Looking back, I can remember when I started having these problems, one of the brass color arms (lever) was getting stuck in one of the carbs. I hope I am explaining it well. So where do you find this brass color arms is when you take the carb bowls off, there is this L shaped brass arm and it was getting stuck and not moving freely and I think that is what caused the problem. I don't regret getting the rest of the work done on the trike because my engine was at 295 hours at that time so an engine rebuild and other mani and pedi cures for the trike were due anyway.
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