Chuck Burgoon

Chuck Burgoon

59 years old
Male
Location
Houston
United States
Current Status
Higher Than Eagles, The Award Winning Memoir of Bobby Wills by his mother Maralys Wills

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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Higher Than Eagles, The Award Winning Memoir of Bobby Wills by his mother Maralys Wills
    1 day ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Paul Hamilton's picture.
    Bob Wills was killed in a hang glider in 1977 by a helicopter’s downwash filming a commercial for Willys Jeep. This is about the book his mother wrote about him: http://www.freepublicitygroup.com/release-maralys-wills-oct10.html
    1 day ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Scott, My Mosquito lives part time in my enclosed trailer (during “fly-in” season like right now). It’s very happy. Some gyro guys who have a tall trailer like mine (tall enough for the trike to sit in it upright), regret having a tall trailer due to extra gas to tow it. What some guys do, and some guys who have tall trailers want to do, it to have either a raised center half length, or a raised center in just the small area to raise the mast. Since I don’t have suspension, it’s easy to have everything move in perfect unison. When you have suspension, like on a trike or gyro, it crucial to have the wing/rotor bounce in perfect unison with the undercarriage. This is difficult and problematic, but can be done. In my case, I can use the roof rafters to support my tail boom and rotors. This would not be feasible for a trike or gyro…unless you jack up the trike on some hard points to prevent the trike’s suspension (and tires) from bouncing out of unison with the wing. Then of course, the only suspension is the trailer’s suspension to absorb all shocks. But the wing and trike could them move in perfect unison, albeit with trailer suspension only. Otherwise you need to have wing “transport-only” struts/support booms attached to the trike to allow the wing and trike to bounce in unison, completely independently from the trailer. Many guys use these transport strut method with success. Thankfully I don’t need to do this.
    2 days ago
    • View all 3 Comments
    • Scott Williams
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      Scott Williams Chuck, very good points about the unison movement. I hadn't thought of that as an issue but you nailed it. So to take it for a ride I will most likely unmount the wing entirely then. The trailers I'm looking at are only 7ft tall inside so I will have to lower my mast and control bar. Not ideal and a big pain but I'm hoping a Kwik fold kit from Antares will help. He's not sure if he has any more left from production but I'm hoping.
      1 day ago
    • John Olson
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      John Olson I haul my wagon on a swimstep mounted on the rear of my motor home, a 4x8 platform, and I keep it zipped into a custom bag that weighs about 2 pounds.  Also in my coach I haul plenty of fuel, oil, tools, spare parts and quite a well-stocked trike-support center. I believe the trike rides very well back there, and I have one experience about just how well. I had left an airfield outside of Austin, TX, and  them boys were putting down plenty of beer as they partied after flying and helped me get loaded-up and tied down. Then I hit the highway around sundown and headed west across the Lone Star State. I drove until I was too weary to drive anymore and so I pulled my trike-support center off on an exit and crawled into my cozy king size bed. In the wee hours I got up to pee and I stepped out the door to whiz under the Milky Way and when I shook the dew off my lilly I discovered a Lone Star longneck, about 1/3 full, sitting upright on the swimstep, where one of the Austin boys had left it, in what I saw as a bit of a sandbag. However, that was back in the day when there was nothing unlawful about driving across Tejas with an open container, so long as it contained Lone Star or Shiner Bock. I dunno if that's still true but you must admit, that's one helluva smooth ride! What I would really like is a Class C coach called a Fun Mover. This has a wide door across the rear that can be lowered like a Toy Hauler and is designed for loading a bike or a quad. But those wagons are pricey, and I paid cash for my ride.
      1 day ago
    • Scott Williams
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      Scott Williams Ha! That's a good tale John. Sounds like a smooth riding rig.
      1 day ago
    • Scott Williams
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      Scott Williams Chuck, very good points about the unison movement. I hadn't thought of that as an issue but you nailed it. So to take it for a ride I will most likely unmount the wing entirely then. The trailers I'm looking at are only 7ft tall inside so I will have to lower my mast and control bar. Not ideal and a big pain but I'm hoping a Kwik fold kit from Antares will help. He's not sure if he has any more left from production but I'm hoping.
      1 day ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Somebody asked about this offline: https://www.flickr.com/photos/donliddard/5032653074/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/donliddard/3015797621/ http://flickrhivemind.net/Tags/soarmaster/Interesting http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Soarmaster_modified_flphg_power_unit.jpg Besides chopping off toes they were also prone to tucking and tumbling.
    2 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Gerald Marsh's picture.
    It's a Trendak Twistair. I like the Tercel. A Zenon copy with more HP. It's likely my next aircraft. http://trendak.eu/models/tercel
    2 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Gerald Marsh's picture.
    On my Gyke (gyro/trike) project it became apparent from the beginning that, in general, gyros make bad trikes and trikes make bad gyros. There are exceptions, like the MTO style, which readily lend themselves to a trike application. The MTO is ...
    3 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Reklaw Fly-in 2014: Wow...what a great time! Over 400 aircraft, and it was an absolute blast. Boy did you guys miss a good one. There were over 400 airplanes, 5 helicopters, 0 gyros, 0 trikes, 0 PPCs...what a shame. Rotorcraft had the whole right side of the airport, and a huge open mowed field to fly in/out of. The flying and camping conditions were perfect. Two incidents. Both were guys who came in high and hot and overshot the end of the runway. No injury, just some aircraft damage. There must have been more than a thousand take-off and landings. I flew five times, but could have flown much more.
    4 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon http://www.pilotsofamerica.com/forum/showthread.php?t=76064
      3 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon Reklaw! Dunno if you boys and girls have heard of this annual fly in, held at the Flying M Ranch each year, but it's got a reputation for being the baddest-ass fly in on the planet, in a state full of bigger than life, bad-ass people. And I mean that in a good way. Well, we attended today. Hoe-Lee-Chit, what an amazingly wonderful cluster-fu*k of insanity, sort of a cross between a Hell's Angel Rally, your mother's bridge club, and Burning Man. Oh, but with airplanes. 500+ airplanes. On a 4000' grass strip, in the middle of nowhere, with few rules. In one day, hell, one hour, I saw more close calls and aviation insanity than in my previous two decades of flying. We spent the day vacillating between wonder, awe, shock, and fear. It was cool, and terrifying. ADS-B traffic was a godsend and a curse today. On the one hand, it may have saved our lives. On the other hand, it scared me so much, I nearly flew home. My screen looked like it was covered with ants, all of them within 5 miles of this strip, all seemingly going in random directions -- including straight up. Still, I pressed on. Winds were perfectly favoring RWY 20, for which I was set up from the moment we launched from the coast. Strangely, as we flew into radio range, everyone was landing on RWY 02 -- the reciprocal runway. A direct (if light) tailwind. When I was five miles out, maneuvering to join the "pattern" to land, someone came on the radio and announced that the field was closed for the next five minutes. Everyone had to go somewhere, so we went to nearby Cherokee County, with gas for just $4.48 a gallon! Sweet! (Never thought I would think $4+/gallon was cheap, but here we are...) As I was gassing up, the FBO guy showed me a cellphone picture he had just received of a Thorp T-18 that had gone off the end of the Reklaw runway, into a pond. Yup, landing downwind, he soared right into the drink, and they were pulling the remains of the plane back down the runway, forcing the runway closure. Ouch. So, after fueling, we launch for the 10 mile flight back into the maelstrom. Amazingly, I enter a downwind for a completely invisible runway, based solely on my GPS. The strip is surrounded by 100' tall pine trees, making it utterly invisible from the sides. I pressed on, slicing through base to final, and roll out on a nice stabilized approach. A guy calls out "Do I have enough time to get out?" -- to which I stupidly say "Sure, go ahead!" And he sits there. And he doesn't move. Finally, he begins to roll, agonizingly slowly, but now I'm on short final -- too late. I announce I'm going around. I rejoin the pattern with planes whizzing around from seemingly everywhere. Apparently it's normal for everyone to do high speed low approaches, sometimes in formation, from every possible entry point. I come perilously close to colliding with a Cessna, and break off my downwind leg. I then fly five miles out to catch my breath, and reassess. I'm on a RIGHT base, sort of, but see my opening and go for it. Screw the pattern -- I'm landing during this little lull! I turn to final, flare to land...and the ground falls away from me as fast as I'm sinking. WTF? Then, just as quickly, all of the sudden it's coming UP at me! Bang! That was landing #1. I'm airborne again, but stick with it, and the ground does the whole down/up thing again. Bang! That was landing #2. Now I'm airborne again, slow, running out of airspeed, elevator authority, and ideas. Bang! This is the biggest ski-jump of them all, but I stick with it, keep the stick in my gut, and keep most of the impact on the mains. I then make a fairly normal landing, with nothing but silence from the back seat. We have...arrived. I roll to the end, find a spot on the side of the runway, and shut down in the shade of the trees. It's so lovely, peaceful and quiet... Then, two Skyhawks (!), ten feet apart and 20' off the deck, fly 30' away from us at 120 knots, pull up at a 60 degree angle, and disappear. Welcome to Reklaw! lol We walk 4000' back to where all the food tents are, and I am amazed at what I just landed on. This is a steep HILL we are climbing, with swales and round-bottom ditches in it! Sure, the grass is cut nice and short, but it is anything but level. Anyone who says the nosegear on an RV is anything but tough has never seen my landing at Reklaw. It took a good beating! As we walked, a 182 landed, stopped and turned hard left -- right into the path of a Cherokee departing. The Archer cleared the Skylane's tail by 30 feet, just 50' away from us. Insane. The rest of the day was like any other fly in. Good people, food, lots of fun -- and nonstop low approaches. Everything from a Howard DGA to a Stearman, to a flight of Yaks, to RVs with smoke on, all screaming down the active runway below the trees, while planes are taxiing, departing and arriving. It was NUTS. And cool! Amazingly it all worked. Well, except for the T-18 driver, who couldn't handle the tailwind, down hill landing. I watched as he (and helpers) forlornly pulled the wings off, water pouring out of the spinner, with the interior removed and drying in the sun. Looking where he had gone off the end, it could have been much, much worse. Still, it was great fun. Seemingly everyone knew us (or at least the plane!), and they gave us a great farewell on the Unicom frequency. Mindful of Mary seated directly behind me, I declined to do the requisite low pass on departure. lol Oh, and as I was leaving, I had to abort my takeoff, when three old guys decided to walk right across the runway as I was on the roll! Never looked, didn't care. Crazy! On the flight home, I laughed and told Mary we should go back tomorrow. She said, and I quote: "NO ****ING WAY!" __________________ Jay Honeck Port Aransas on Mustang Island, TX Van's RV-8A N14EG ('13 - ?) Pathfinder N56993 ('02 - '13) Ercoupe N94856 ('08 - '10) Warrior N33431 ('98 - '02)
      3 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    "Chuck Burgoon" commented on Abid Farooqui's Blog "Jet Star 582 brand new --- $35,500.00".
    Fuel Injection Rotax 600 series: http://www.supertraxmag.com/article.asp?nid=397
    7 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    "Chuck Burgoon" commented on Abid Farooqui's Blog "Jet Star 582 brand new --- $35,500.00".
    Abid is right about sticking with standard proven components, but some people just enjoy experimenting. If you are one of these people, here are some others: FI for small Rotax… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVhtMuIItjk Uploaded on Oct ...
    8 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon “Airplanes are for people who can't fly anything else.” – (saw this on a poster recently)
    9 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Scott, I too would like to hear about FI feedback for them. I've convereted my two 582's to Nippondenso ignition and have all the upgrades you can put on them. I've looked at numerous carb options, but like FI.
    10 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Heather Davis's Video.
    If only modern camera technology could capture smells too. The first thing I thought of is how it smells to fly in low mist.
    10 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Abid Farooqui's picture.
    Amen... I guess we are both getting older and lazier ;-) I can remember carrying my folded up hang glider on my shoulder and harness up long steep mountain trails to fly.
    11 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon 2014 Anahuac Fly-In...Thanks to all the hard work of the organizers and the large group of attendees...it was a great success. Lots of gyros, 2 helicopters, two airplanes, one PPC, no trikes....and a lot of folks without aircraft. The flying conditions were perfect, food was great, and to friendship memorable. Reklaw is next week...hope at least one trike shows up.
    11 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon Of the 25 or so gyros about a third flew in and the rest were trailered or based there.
      11 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Abid Farooqui's picture.
    I live on an airpark and am strictly a "hanger trike" guy nowadays. I sold my "road trike" and loath setting them up and breaking them down. I plan to never take one on the road again.
    13 days ago

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Soarmaster, Bennett, Jet-Wing, Cosmos, KB2 Gyro, Monarch Gyro, Aquilla, Pegasus, Continental Cruiser, South Wings, Antares, Rotorway, Hughes, Mosquito, Quickie Tri-Q2, KR2, Twin Comanche

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  • Victor Agadzi
    by Victor Agadzi 1 year ago
    Hi Chuck,

    Experimental Amateur built gyros do not carry separate ratings for land or sea.
    I transitioned from a triking background and needed 2 CFI's, one to recommend me and the other to give me the check ride.
    I did both on land and then transitioned myself into water. Had one prior flight off water in a similar gyro couple of months prior but my Gyro I setup a little differently. Let me know whenever you are in the Pensacola area and I will show u my bird. Awesome.. Love your yellow heli in the pictures.. What gyro do u fly? What trike do u fly?