Chuck Burgoon

Chuck Burgoon

59 years old
Male
Location
Houston
United States
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Sorry for the many typos on previous post...but I can't edit or delete it (it's blocked…why I don’t know). I checked and am pretty sure it was the Flightstar that Marty was killed in. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flightstar

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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Sorry for the many typos on previous post...but I can't edit or delete it (it's blocked…why I don’t know). I checked and am pretty sure it was the Flightstar that Marty was killed in. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flightstar
    4 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon John: I can’t access the comments section (it’s usually blocked). Yes they were Jetwings. At the same time Gordon was in the business in Houston I was doing the same thing in Baton Rouge. Obtained all the major dealerships for ultralights and hang gliders. I did all initial training towing over water. I found student could easily transition to trikes after gaining proficiency with “deep water” starts. That was taking off on floats, as opposed to the advanced method of shore launched on foot called “pop-off beach start” which was a god name for them. Poo-off…was an understatement. Like many of the guys in the business in the early days I was a dealer for various Ultralight and hang glider manufactures and trikes for Leaf trikes, Soarmaster trikes, Bennett trikes, and Flight Design trikes (Jetwings). Note that the Jetwing was the Revo of the day when it first came out. The original model did not have a re-drive and were initially called the Jetwing ATV and were marketed to be a beach buggy with big tires, an airboat, and an ultralight. Quickly they realized it was only good toe flying. I’ve owned and heavily modified many of them. Yes, they had several inherent design problems, most of which I corrected in mine. Some of the wings had bad turns in them that I never could tune out. Note they were the only wing ever (as far as I know) that has straight double stitching instead of the stretchable zig-zag every sailmaker used. They had a marketing blurb for it. Some of the wings came with sleeved keel, but many did not, so that was the first thing you had to check (with a hooked wire slide inside). I’ve seen several Demons with permanently bowed leading edges from being heavily loaded or pushed too hard. Never saw one break, but seems like I heard of it happening. Perhaps you’ve seen the old Dukes of Hazard episode where they flew into a fence (Joe Greblo as I recall) and looked quite convincing, even though you could tell it was Balsa Wood. I put modified Jetwing trikes on all kinds of wings, Ravens, Ducks, Phoenixs, Fledges, Streaks, to name a few. The best combo was the Bennett Streak (fully detached lower surface). Everybody who demo-ed one bought one. I still have some old Jetwings parts laying around I occasionally cannibalize for one thing or another. Note that Jetwings came with Demons and Javelins. The Flight Designs Demon was derived from the venerable Hiway Demon (Bob England, who also designed the Bennett Streak, and soon after died flying a paraglider). Perhaps you recall that Marty Alemeda, the owner of Flight Designs was killed flying their new fixed wing they planned to market. I think Tom Peghiney designed it, but can’t recall for sure. http://www.delta-club-82.com/bible/74-hang-glider-lancer-4.htm The Flight Designs factory had a two-place side-by-side version of the Jetwing, which I flew and…let’s just say…I knew another guy who had one. The had a really cool logo (De-Vinci) inspired, and the stickers looked nice on your helmet. Speaking of helmet stickers…I also had a sticker in the 70’s…the rainbow sticker was very popular and meant happiness…long before it meant what it means today. I know cringe when I see old photos of myself…”Not that there is anything wrong with that” to quote Jerry Seinfeld.
    4 days ago
    • View all 4 Comments
    • John Olson
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      John Olson I always wondered what happened to Marty. My impression of the Demon is that it was a Comet clone. Good story Chuck.
      4 days ago
    • Gregg Ludwig
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      Gregg Ludwig Chuck- You should boat tow with us sometime soon at www.LakeShoreHG.com
      4 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon Yes...it's been a long time since I've done it. Thanks for the invite. Many fond memories...and a few not so fond...failed releases and bad boat drivers ;-)
      4 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon Initially we were boat towing with a three point bridle with two releases (upper & lower). The first release rt was for the top attachment, then after a very steep climb-out then the base tube release allowed the bridle to drop away. The Donnell Hewitt a physics professor from Kerrville Texas invented “Skyting” which was true center-of-mass towing. This was considered to be sacrilege…and so dangerous that he was banned from the Hang Gliding Magazine. I started Skyting right away, but still preferred the old method for boat towing. Then all of us tow guys came up with a hundred different permutations of a sort-of center of mass towing method, with an equal number of bridles and releases. I spent the first 20 years of my flying mostly being a test pilot. Towing has certainly evolved a lot over the years and has a very good safety record. I’ve had a lot of towing discussions lately with a guy wanting to build and tow a foot launched gyro like this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JrT8bKQB0A he’s a young guy with no knowledge and I’m trying to help keep him alive and persuade him to give it up, but it looks like he won’t.
      4 days ago
    • John Olson
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      John Olson I always wondered what happened to Marty. My impression of the Demon is that it was a Comet clone. Good story Chuck.
      4 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Gordon is in our Houston club and he has a column in out newsletter. Thought you might enjoy this month’s installment. The History of Ultralights - Part 5 By Gordon Cross Flight # 908 January 23rd 1982, my first flight in an ultralight trike. As our business increased we applied for dealerships with all the major ultralight manufacturers. Each new dealership required a minimum purchase of 3 planes or hang gliders. Because we sold so many planes, Butch set it up where we only had to buy one. Flight Designs was one such business. The fledgling company built hang gliders and was one of the first to offer a motorized trike assembly that attached to the hang glider wing. I don’t remember if Tom Peghiny was on board at the time but he eventually bought the company. The hang glider came in first. It was a little beefier than normal and it was called the Demon. I flew it a couple of times at Packsaddle and Elephant Mountain. A few months before the trike / motor part arrived we got a call to take some training. There were a few homemade trikes around the country and all were similar to the ones we see today. The early ones were single seat, small engine, and could be attached to most any stock hang glider. The hang glider purest did not like any kind of motors but the trike was breaking new ground. Flight Designs setup the dealer training class in Dallas to serve the Southeast region. Our dealer friends from Dallas, Lone Star Ultralights, would sponsor the event. I drove up to Dallas and we met at small grass strip airport. The instructors showed us how the trike and hang glider worked together. The rest of the session for me was pretty simple. The instructor said: Do you know how to fly a hang glider? “Yes, I have flown the Demon before.” Do you know how to fly an ultralight? “Yes, and I have flown a motorized hang glider too.” Your first, get in. The instructor told me to add just enough power to get the front wheel off the ground and just do a wheelie down the strip. After doing that twice he said this was the attitude the nose needs to be in during climb and flare for landing. Go fly. I was trying to maintain my best macho pilot front as possible without letting anyone see my hands and knees shaking. I would have preferred someone else fly first. The trike had a Kawasaki 440 with a belt drive like the Wizard. The wheels were cheap plastic spoke type as seen on TOYS. The nose wheel had reverse steering like the Ascender. Most ultralights of the time had no breaks except for the Flintstone type where you drag your feet on the ground. Also like the Ascender there was no seat, just a hammock like sling. The throttle, borrowed from the Jet Ski, was a big trigger affair. At least it was better than the clothes pin arrangement on the Soarmaster. A hang glider with a trike attached flies similar to a hang glider. The triangle shaped control bar is fixed to the wing and the pilot, who is now part of the trike, can shift the center of gravity about the wing to control the angle of attack and bank. Yaw control is handled by the design of the wing. Pushing the control bar out caused the pilot & trike to move back and raise the nose of the wing. Pulling the control bar in caused the nose to lower. Side to side was used for turns. The pilot could yaw the trike for cross wind landings by twisting the control bar. The controls 3 movements were opposite to normal aircraft but when imagine yourself as the control stick, it gets easier. During takeoff you needed to keep the hang glider wing sort of pointed into the wind and just push the control bar out when ready to lift off. So I gave it full throttle while steering backwards with my feet. When I pushed the control bar out instead of the little practice wheelie the trike did a BIG wheelie and immediately took off. The climb out was just as scary as the first flight in the Ascender. It felt like I was going straight up and not really going fast enough to fly. The airspeed indicator said everything should be good and under full power the Demon did not want to stall. The thrust of the motor pushed me and the trike way up under the wing which gave the pilot a feeling that you really pointing up high. The wing normally flew at around 30 degrees nose up and now it felt like 90 degrees. I keep full power and full push out until the Demon climbed to 500 feet. Then I let the control bar come back to neutral. I think the Demon climbed at around 28 MPH with a top speed of 45 in a dive. With the power set to 75% and control bar neutral, the Demon flew around 32 MPH. Compared to the hang glider version without the trike, it flew like it had power steering. Normally the pilot has to shift their weigh around a lot to fly. The trike, motor, and pilot combination seemed to make the wing very stable. The lower center of gravity plus the gyroscopic effect of the spinning prop made the hang glider fly like a Cadillac. The control bar tended to stay where you put it and our instructors had trimmed the wing nearly perfect. Stable flight with power steering was a good thing to experience on my first flight. I motored around practicing turns, climbs, descents, stalls, and slow flight. The instructors had only brought this one plane and there were a dozen pilots waiting to get their chance so it was time to land. Fortunately I had a lot of experience in flaring a weight shift ultralight. Although my landing was not the best, the Demon responded appropriately. All total I flew the Demon in the powered configuration for about 12 hours. I never could seem to get the flare down perfectly but did master crosswinds. Just point the nose of the wing into the wind and fly. After I landed the Flight Design instructors put several other pilots in the Demon. Toward the end of the demo a pilot with no experience in hang gliders or ultralights took off. He must have been a GA pilot because most conventional pilots in ultralights have the same M.O. They often never climb to any significant altitude because they have no experience flying below 50 MPH. Since the plane will not even go 50 they fly around about 35 feet up at full throttle. This guy did just that. He never got higher than 35 feet. We were doing the demos at a small grass strip used by skydivers. There were trees at the end of the runway and everyone thought for sure he would crash into them. But instead of climbing over them he turn around and flew back. We knew he was in trouble because the trike kept pitching up and down and from side to side. Anyway he flew back to where the runway started and turned around again. This time he cut the power and landed safely back on the runway. I will always remember him flying right at those big trees, everyone there was ready for the crash that never happened.
    5 days ago
    • Rizwan Bukhari
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      Rizwan Bukhari Very nice Chuck, thanks for posting
      5 days ago
    • John Olson
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      John Olson Those were Jet Wing trikes, right? They had big hyme(sp?) joints as hang brackets and the wing could spin around on the mast. They all had whacks in the flying wires from the prop.
      5 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    "Chuck Burgoon" commented on Paul Hamilton's Blog "Advanced Trike Maneuvers".
    The link list above seem to express a growing awareness made necessary do to more advanced, high-performing, less forgiving wings.
    5 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Nose wheel shimmy dampers...one I've posted, one is new There is this ..... http://www.northwing.com/steering-da...trofit-kit.htm and these ......http://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Al...3403f6&vxp=mtr
    6 days ago
    • Gregg Ludwig
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      Gregg Ludwig Chuck can we get the ebay link again?
      5 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon http://www.ebay.com/itm/Universal-Alloy-Motorcycle-Adjustable-Steering-Damper-Stabilizer-Top-Tank-Mount-/271358100470?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item3f2e3403f6&vxp=mtr
      4 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    "Chuck Burgoon" commented on Paul Hamilton's Blog "Advanced Trike Maneuvers".
    Spiral Dives…here are some related ...
    6 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon Bolt Cross Sectional Area compared to 3/8": 3/8 1 7/16 1.36 1/2 1.78 9/16 2.25 5/8 2.78 11/16 3.36 3/4 4
    18 days ago
    • John Olson
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      John Olson Chuck I'm purty good with reading and riting but rithmatic was never my strong point. What does this mean?
      17 days ago
    • John Olson
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      John Olson Who/what/where/when did a hang bolt fail?
      17 days ago
    • Michael Huckle
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      Michael Huckle John, Chuck says that a 7/16" bolt has a 36% larger cross-sectional area than a 3/8" bolt.
      17 days ago
    • Paul Hamilton
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      Paul Hamilton so what is the shear strength of the 5/16 an bolt in pounds?
      17 days ago
    • Joe Hockman
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      Joe Hockman Paul, using a 0.6 safety factor, the single shear strength of AN5 (5/16) is 5750 lbs. In a double shear mode as would be the case in a hang block it would be 11500 lbs.
      17 days ago
    • John Olson
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      John Olson Am I getting too fat?
      16 days ago
    • Chuck Burgoon
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      Chuck Burgoon No...I'm getting too lazy.
      15 days ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Larry Mednick's picture.
    My trip to Oshkosh and Mentone got trashed...I'm waiting at the heliport to go offshore for a few weeks...I have to replace a guy...apparently the State Department computer system has been down all week and his paperwork got delayed. I'm thinking ...
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Larry Mednick's picture.
    There will be a pylon race at Mentone...Abid won't do it...Larry?
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Larry Mednick's picture.
    Also Reklaw in October...big fly-in east of Dallas. My personal favorite.
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Larry Mednick's picture.
    It would be great to stop by Mentone the next week and Muscoda the week after... A message from Hoverclub of America: Don't forget to attend this upcoming event. 8th Annual Muscoda Pendelton Memorial Hover In Friday, August 8, 2014 at 12:30 ...
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Larry Mednick's picture.
    Very impressive display Larry!
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Heather Davis's picture.
    Heather if you like flying sayings, quotes, poems, lyrics…here's a 1000 or so: http://www.rotaryforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=39678 Add some more…
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Heather Davis's picture.
    Solo Flight by Tradford The day is just right for companion-less flight, winds are calm with no clouds in the sky, the critical gear has received the “all clear” – now she’s fueled and deemed ready-to-fly. The mixture’s full-rich, I ...
    1 month ago
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    Chuck Burgoon
    Chuck Burgoon commented on Heather Davis's picture.
    Karen Ravn: Only as high as I reach can I grow, Only as far as I seek can I go, Only as deep as I look can I see, Only as much as I dream can I be.
    1 month ago

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Soarmaster, Bennett, Jet-Wing, Cosmos, KB2 Gyro, Monarch Gyro, Aquilla, Pegasus, Continental Cruiser, South Wings, Antares, Rotorway, Hughes, Mosquito, Quickie Tri-Q2, KR2, Twin Comanche

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  • Victor Agadzi
    by Victor Agadzi 10 months ago
    Hi Chuck,

    Experimental Amateur built gyros do not carry separate ratings for land or sea.
    I transitioned from a triking background and needed 2 CFI's, one to recommend me and the other to give me the check ride.
    I did both on land and then transitioned myself into water. Had one prior flight off water in a similar gyro couple of months prior but my Gyro I setup a little differently. Let me know whenever you are in the Pensacola area and I will show u my bird. Awesome.. Love your yellow heli in the pictures.. What gyro do u fly? What trike do u fly?