John Farmer died in a Trike crash

Published by: Rizwan Bukhari on 12th Mar 2018 | View all blogs by Rizwan Bukhari

http://www.dailycommercial.com/news/20180226/authorities-id-pilot-killed-in-ultralight-crash-as-orlando-man

 

 

EUSTIS – Authorities on Monday identified the pilot of an ultralight that crashed while approaching Eustis Airport Sunday morning.

According to a report released Monday, a witness said John Farmer of Orlando had been doing touch-and-go’s on the airport runway with his red and white Trike ultralight just after 8 a.m. Sunday and then flew south away from the air strip. The witness said Farmer made a final approach back to the airport but crashed beyond the tree line.

The witness, Russell Smith, rushed to the scene and found the plane overturned on top of Farmer. He and a worshiper from a nearby church lifted the plane off him.

Smith said he cut the pilot out of his harness and began doing CPR. A Lake County Sheriff’s deputy arrived at the scene and said it was clear Farmer was dead. Farmer was 47.

“I’ve been through a few of these before,” Smith said. “I knew he was right but I’m trained to do CPR until paramedics get on the scene.”

The Federal Aviation Administration, which was called in to investigate, has identified the plane as a XT-912 Tundra Arrow Ultralight .

 

Smith said while he didn’t see the crash, he never heard the engine cut out. He speculated that the aircraft stalled, meaning that the fabric wings weren’t getting enough lift even if the engine was still running. That can happen with any aircraft, he said, but with an ultralight flying so low to the ground, there is little time to recover from a stall and the result can be fatal.

“If you don’t have lift and gravity is pulling you down, then you’re basically going 150 miles an hour into the ground,” he said.

Smith also said the drafts can be tricky around that airport, especially around the tree line.

 

 

 

Comments

45 Comments

  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Very sad news indeed. I remember looking at his pictures and when he joined the sites .
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 months ago
    I heard it was the test flight being his first flight in that make and model.
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 4 months ago
    If that's the case, it's one aircraft where a good instructor should have been onboard. The sheriff's comments are obviously wide of the mark and I wouldn't want to speculate on the cause, but everyone should be aware that the Arrow S needs a little understanding.

    Very, very sad news.
  • Fred Snyder
    by Fred Snyder 4 months ago
    Very sad to hear, John was a great guy.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 months ago
    Yes I remember that trike/wing combination having a tricky right turn tendency that gave me pause test flying one. Yes some transition instruction is always helpful in any trike. Very sad.
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 4 months ago
    On the Arrow S, an uncoordinated turn may 'stick' and the pilot may find that they cannot roll out of the turn unless they coordinate the turn first.

    The need for every pilot to understand turns has been well covered. I am not suggesting that this accident is related; it is however a tragic reminder that as pilots we have a responsibility to know what we're doing. So many fatalities seem to be occurring in straightforward flight in benign conditions.

    My condolences to all who knew the pilot.
  • Andy Hughes
    by Andy Hughes 4 months ago
    Bryan Tuffnell You state:
    "On the Arrow S, an uncoordinated turn may 'stick' and the pilot may find that they cannot roll out of the turn unless they coordinate the turn first". What do you mean by uncoordinated turn? too much bar pressure making you loose speed/lift? Is it like a turn and stall? Would you pull the bar in and heavy on the power to get your self out of trouble? Andy
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 4 months ago
    Hi Andy ~ try this: http://www.trikepilot.com/magazine/read/more-on-turns_1167.html

    I don't believe that stalling is as big an issue as it's often made out to be. I do believe that unbalanced turns are biting more pilots than is given credit.

    The problem with a slipped turn is that it holds billow shift in the lower wing. On most wings in most situations, you cannot generate a slip (and therefore billow shift) that you cannot overcome by weight shifting to the high side when trying to roll out of the turn. Most wings just don't slip enough to be an issue. Occasionally though, weight shift cannot overcome the billow shift induced by slip - the Arrow will sustain a slip. The answer is to push forward to cancel the slip and balance the billow on each wing half, then roll level.

    I believe that trying to roll against slip has killed more than a few pilots, but it works often enough to become a 'normal' turn for many trike pilots. When a wing comes along that is a little more insistent on being flown properly than most, that wing gets over-represented in accident statistics. A lot of wings made now have the 'fun factor' built right out of them in order to accommodate poor pilot technique. I believe that we, as a group, really need to learn the basics of balanced turns, and this would make us better and safer pilots.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 months ago
    Amazing how after a novel length discussion, Bryan now can sum up the whole thing in just a few perfectly worded phrases. Well said Bryan!
  • Andy Hughes
    by Andy Hughes 4 months ago
    So Larry, is he right or are you just being facetious? I would really like to know in the off chance I get caught up in a tight turn towards a landing. Andy
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 months ago
    He is dead on. He just summed up pages and pages of the point in the blog.

    If coordinating turns is absent from your flying, please seek additional training to take your flying to the next level. It will inhance your safety, capability and enjoyment of flying a Trike. It works on all wings although more important on some wings than others.

    If you want to learn more, click on the link above. Also I made a video a while back. I’ll bring it up on the home page again. It doesn’t explain how to coordinate turns as much as how to and what is a slip.
  • Bill Barry
    by Bill Barry 4 months ago
    Larry, I can see where Andy is coming from.
    When we watched Henry and Ken's video, the answer to avoiding the crash was to pull in to roll level.
    What I understand is that with some wings you can be in a slip and need to push out in order to coordinate the turn before it is possible to roll level, pulling in to roll will not work.
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 4 months ago
    Getting to know your wing while at altitude is the preferred method in the learning curve! Going around the pattern for the first time doesn't leave you with many options. Crow-hopping will tell you if the wing properly tuned, the CG is within range, and the powerplant is performing safely. Prior to any low-altitude crank-and-bank maneuvers the pilot should know all of the inputs necessary to preserve altitude and control of their ship!
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Larry Mednick. Could you please insert your video you made on slipping turns? Really good for the flock. Thank you bryan for your clear and acurate exsplaination.
    When i went for my flight exam in the arrow wing in austrailia i had no problem . Taking off stabbing against the p factor. And cordinating my turn. But latter at altitude on one leg of the journey i was in the back seat when there was some difficulty in roll. I didnt understand it at the time but now it makes perfect sense as bryan describes it. If you are flying a more advanced wing for the first time get some transitional training for sure.
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    This is very clear

    https://youtu.be/evPA1h6hXfk
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 months ago
    Yes the confusion of push first then pull...

    A spiral dive/descent should be finished off by pushing the bar forward to set it in motion. Then when its time to exit, you should be exiting a coordinated turn and pulling back and rolling level should work effectively.

    When you push forward as you reach maximum bank angle you should see that pushing straight forward (not on an angle) causes the nose to yaw into the turn and stops any unwanted overbanking tendency. Then to level the wings pulling in and over is how I exit the turn back to straight and level.

    So, in and over, to exit. And in, over and OUT to initiate. or some may just go sideways and OUT to initiate which I dont think is wrong and depends on the Wing and preferred technique. But sideways by itself, or worse would be sideways to initiate and sideways the other way to stop the roll IS WRONG AND BAD TECHNIQUE. and in some cases is a life threatening technique.
  • Frank Roush
    by Frank Roush 4 months ago
    This is described in the Weight Shift Control Aircraft Flying Handbook, Chapter 6 Flight Maneuvers. "In all constant altitude, constant airspeed turns, it is necessary to increase the angle of attack of the wing when rolling into the turn by pushing out on the control bar. This is required because..."
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 months ago
    Yes Frank good work locating the basics of coordinated turns for trikes. Which is most interesting is the WHY (higher load factor) as described in the WSC Handbook.

    It should be noted that the in, over and out turn technique is nothing new. It is the classic "J" turn as described in my "Be A Sport Pilot Learn to Fly a Trike" video and a test question in the Trike training syllabus for instructor and student to discuss and learn.

    Note that when you add a 1. side slippery wing, 2. P-factor (at full throttle), 3. Torque (at full throttle) PLUS 4. lack of pitch coordination you have a "recipe for disaster". Four separate and distinct factors all add up.

    So again, for any one transitioning to a new trike, especially a high performance model, Please seek transition training.
  • Joe Hockman
    by Joe Hockman 4 months ago
    It makes sense to me that a pilot with most of their experience flying slower wings with sloppier technique may be in for a rude awakening on initial flights with a higher performance wing, like the Arrow S, where the wing is not as forgiving of the sloppier technique. A slipping turn that is not coordinated in an Arrow wing that "sticks" during initial flights for a pilot that does not realize correct way to respond is a very threatening scenario. Yes, of course it is a good idea to get some transition time with an instructor if your new wing is considerably different from what you have been flying. I also can understand why some might choose to bypass that opportunity.

    For the pilot that bypasses that transition, I think Doug Boyle gave the most useful advice above. A couple quotes from Doug, "Getting to know your wing while at altitude is the preferred method in the learning curve! Going around the pattern for the first time doesn't leave you with many options" and "Prior to any low-altitude crank-and-bank maneuvers the pilot should know all of the inputs necessary to preserve altitude and control of their ship!". Absolutely right on Doug. You can learn a bit about the idiosyncrasies of a new wing by gaining enough altitude prior to testing response to various maneuvers. Apparently this was not the case with this fatality since a report from one of his best friends was that the fatal accident occurred on his first flight around the pattern. In any case, I would have thought that Doug's comments above would be considered "common sense" but maybe it is not so common. My condolences to John's family and friends.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 months ago
    Yes as Doug and Joe commented, I agree, "the ground is what gets you".
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 months ago
    Note to all, the new Airborne high performance wings have been made slip proof with winglets. The old Airborne SST, Arrow and Arrow S wings can be updated to get the new winglets which means you cannot even force it into a side slip for more than a fraction of a second. Now like many other wings, their most high performance Wing is extremely forgiving no matter the circumstances or lack of technique.
  • Joe Hockman
    by Joe Hockman 4 months ago
    Yes Larry, I understand that Airborne does now provide those winglets. John bought this trike from Armin Engert and it did not have winglets. Perhaps John did not understand the importance of those winglets or whether he should even get them. I have flown my GT6 quite a bit with and without my winglets and I fully understand how they affect performance and handling and yes it certainly makes sense to me that one would not be able to sustain a slipped turn for long on an Arrow with winglets. At any rate, I am guessing that John would still be around had he had winglets for that wing. Very tragic.
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 4 months ago
    I would regard those winglets as absolutely essential for anyone flying those wings who does not coordinate turns. To some extent those winglets are like training wheels on a kid's bike: they limit the options of the pilot and will not stop accidents; they just prevent slip. They should not be seen as an alternative to proper technique.
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Pardon my french but if there was a problem shouldnt the winglets be made madatory. I mean maybe john didnt even know? Concidering the high number of fatalitys in the arrow s wing . Theres alot of technical discussion above and brillant and amazing and i do have some trouble keeping up in that loop. So dont take that as criticizem. As paul has mentioned basicly the handbook is not meant to be an advanced tech bulletin. But it does address cordinated turns well and we as pilots should know this.
    I find that when pilots discribe weather they like a wing they base that on their own abilitys mostly.
    I learned a long time ago that theres an abiguous balancing act between manufactures liability, responsability the need to advance keeping cash flowing and openess when things dont go as planned. It seems to me that realeasing a new advancing wing that may be sucseptable to possable liabilitys even though the wing may be flown correctly well by talented pilots but then may pos a greater risk factor in the hands of a pilot who seems seasoned but makes occational mistakes. I mean their is security for manufacturers that make forgiving wings. I mean i know we will always have statistics . But the sport all around survives better with a lower fatality rate dosnt it. I guess what iam getting at is what needs to change be adress or talked about more than just the technical side is how can we be more far reaching in making pilots realize that we maybe over are head and skills with certain models. Iam not pointing the finger at anyone just looking for discussion other than just a technical aspect. Lets say the you have a short not very muscular in the arms moderately trained pilot who buys a 912 with an arrow s like wing cause hes got cash in hand. Is that pilot setting himself up for hidden risk ? Off course And that hurts all of us. Now i mean to be fair and we have pushed the training training button before. For myself and this is just personal i really dont need to fly all that dynamic . I can be content flying with a little forgiveness and cruising around a bit. But thats just me
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 4 months ago
    You raise a great point, David - we choose wings to suit ourselves, and isn't it great that we can.

    But if we strive to make wings that overcome all our lack of skills, does that drive the philosophy of the development of the sport closer to the point where trikes don't take off at all, or all motorcycles should have three wheels so they don't tip over, or our boating is done in knee deep water? I'm not trying to be facetious, but there are plenty of people who think we're taking an absurd risk for flying any trike.

    If everyone accepted that understanding balanced turns was a basic skill that everyone should master, we wouldn't be having this conversation and there'd would be fewer deaths in our sport. Every three axis, rotary and hang glider pilot learns balanced turns; we seem to be the ones who regard it as unnecessary except in special cases. Making trikes that are capable of overcoming some of our flaws may well be an effective way of overcoming a deficit in training, but it might also result in us becoming less knowledgeable and skilled as pilots. If we relinquish some of the control of our aircraft to devices such as winglets - which I firmly believe have their place - we also take away some of the freedom of expression that to me is joy of flying.

    To each their own, and I'm glad for the choice.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 months ago
    Not that anyone reads the manual, but there IS a section in the manual that addresses the flight characteristics and pilot skill level in the manual. It is called “the flight training supplement” have a look at page 118-121 in the REVO MANUAL here

    http://evolutiontrikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/7.1-Aircraft-Operating-Instructions-AOI-Rev-7.0-2017.pdf

    This is supposed to address things like we are talking about. Perhaps a sticker on the control bar that, once again, no one reads, could help direct them to the manual.

    I know most Cessna pilots know they can’t fly a Pitts without more training and airplanes do not all Fly alike by any means. I guess maybe because the similar physical appearance of our wings, people forget they can be as different as any 2 airplanes in terms of Flight characteristics and pilot skill required.

    As WE is getting at, half the problem is not knowing if the new Wing is harder to fly or if their current Wing is easy to fly or not by comparison.
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Bryan well i uhh prosperity has kinda made its way to flee from me so i fly whatever i can get my hands on. I guess what i mean is freedom of choice may also be related to finacial ability. So perhaps a pilot may also be placing himself at risk perchasing and inferior product because of finances.
    Thank you and larry both you said something to me on another blog that strikes home on this issue and how hard you stive to be a better pilot.
    So i guess i can use larry as an example. Watching his videos as everyone knows larry is an exceedingly talented pilot. But larry is also selling and marketing a product. So how do we know how much of the flying is the wing or how much is the talent of the pilot. So the answer and is to larrys credit because i have heard him preach this over and over. Transitional training. So maybe we ought to give this more exsposure and preach it to the choir. Iam all for whatever it takes to greatly reduce fatalitys
    I try to be as safe as i can be knowing my abilitys and shortcomings
    I also know there are risks to everything in life and no matter what you do things can happen. Thats life and the risk we asume to live. How do we define ,exsplore without ignorance in a fair manner when we start seeing simular patterns when fatalitys happen in particular products? What is the protocal on a forum of intulecual thinkers. Acident ivestigations are limited and vauge sometimes.
    Sometimes with even are best technalogical intulectual thinking a hidden undescovered flaw presenting a undiscovered risk may be present. It happens in auto manufactures and aerospace all the time. Remember the challenger and the o rings.
    So what really is are unbias discovery process and how open should that be?
  • Noel Clifford
    by Noel Clifford 4 months ago
    When I first considered purchasing a trike I was in my early stages of training and completely oblivious of the vagaries of SSt wings and arrow S wings. I seriously looked at an airborne 912 with an SST wing to purchase and it was really only through forums like this that I got an inkling that perhaps these wings were not the ideal option for a newbie.
    There is a clear path in GA training where students commence training on aircraft that have very predictable flight characteristics and require further endorsements to graduate to higher performance aircraft. The the same does not necessarily apply to Trikes where students can basically learn to train on any wing or change to a more high performance wing soon after qualifying and there is nothing to control this except for the sage advice of good instructors (thanks Larry and Paul).
    I am sure I will get howled down against over regulation of our sport but it does worry me that fatalities in trikes are somewhat heavily represented by SST and Arrow wings and I suspect it is partly due to the owners of such wings not having a clear understanding of their flight characteristics.
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Big howdy noel and i respect everyone opinion here! And its great that their are some very knowlegeable people chiming in here. Bryan larry paul ext. Its hard for us who know well some of these pilots who have been killed flying these wings such as are mutual friend buzzy and his wife. And i think about them all the time. And its also hard to know exactly what the facts are in most crashes. Is their something were missing, are we being fair to airbourne are we being fair to are pilot community. I think everyones opinions are based in finding reasonable solutions and born out true concern for everyone.
    Truthfully what i have recieved and agree with out of a concenses of knowlegable pilots is that if you are stepping into a more advancing trike or wing be well informed and follow through with transitional training. Get fully ajusted to a new wing with an instructor and some altitude. And continue there after with a good flying attitude and sufficiant margine of safety awareness. Every wing with increasing performance has tradeoffs . Joe made a good point if you are transitioning into the arrow s. Get the winglets . Fly with them first then latter if you want fly without them. Its great we can comunicate and recieve valuable advice on these forums. Its only going to ruduce accident rates if we take good advice and follow it. Like paul has mentioned its ultimately up to the pilot!
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 4 months ago
    Noel, just to be fair. It is not just Arrow wing, other manufacturers also had wings that were not the best design and prone to get into Spiral easily. But I agree with the idea that when learning a new wing that you're not familiar would require more training. It would be foolish not to invest in transition training.
  • jeff trike
    by jeff trike 4 months ago
    In post #2, Larry said "I heard it was the test flight being his first flight in that make and model."

    That's all you need to know.

    Trike flying has risks and need to be approached with a respect, always.

    I am getting a new Rival-X wing. Currently I have logged about 1700 hours and made 2100 landings in my trike. I have been flying for more than 14 years, and have flown 7 different wings. I could easily delude myself that "I don't need any transition training" I could just set it up and go, but there is no way on earth I am going to do that. Things can go wrong so easily.

    Maybe it's because I remember my first solo trike flight. I did get it back on the ground with a couple bounces and rolling over off the edge of the runway into the dirt, but it could have easily been much worse. No damage except to my ego. I think the fear from not being in full control that I can still remember from that first solo flight has made me a better pilot. I know how easily things can go wrong. I even approach new wing tip camera mounts with caution.

    There is no way I would ever hop into trike with a new wing without an experienced pilot on board to act as a safety net. I flew with Larry in his Rival-S wing, and got a feel for it. I know a local pilot (Justin) who has a Rival-X and asked him to take me up for a ride. First, with me in the back seat. I made a couple take offs and landings there, until I felt very comfortable flying there and I knew the front seat would be a piece of cake. Then we switched and I took the front seat. That is how it should be. Minimal risk and enjoyable. Ask for help. It is a hassle, and maybe embarrassing. I am glad I did, and I made a new trike flying friend in the process.
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Wise advise from exsperience. Congratulations jeff i hear that rival s is very nice wing
  • Tony  Castillo
    by Tony Castillo 4 months ago
    Maybe we need to start thinking about rating trike wings? USHGA has done it for a long time, now USHPA is also continuing their rating program and expand to Para gliders. Food for thought
    https://www.ushpa.org/page/ratings-and-skills-introduction
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 4 months ago
    Amen Tony, I myself have been an advocate of this idea and have discussed this before. I started a new blog to get Trike pilot consensus.

    Jeff, I would love, if you could share your experience with Rival X wing.
  • White Eagle
    by White Eagle 4 months ago
    Hmmm more regulation iam not sure were not opening a can of worms here. I believe jeff was kinda hiting a nail on the head with it was johns first test flight in the arrow. Are we also going to figure in the crashes that have included instructors. I personally dont think we will be able to regulate our problems away. A while back their were quite a few fatalitys in revos . We could say well lets rate the trike as well.
    But with good analization i think anyone would find that their were many ignored factors by the pilots in most cases i saw if not all. And yes i have been suspicious of the arrow wing. But behind the scenes ive had many private discussions with many pilots and cfis.And i thought we were coming to a pretty good consensus that this is really boiling down to transition and pilots responsability for the decision making process. I like the shortest route to solving problems. And i think that is pointing a finger at myself. I have flown about 6 or 7 different trike wings and i have had a cfi introduce me to each one including the arrow s. I would be most happy to spend some time with larry flying the rival s. No regulation makes me want to do that
    I want to do that because i want to be a better pilot than i am.
    From the best of my analytical observation i can say the best thing anyone can do to reduce fatalitys in trikes or wings is continued or transitional training of high quality period!
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 3 months ago
    At Sun n Fun 2018 I had the opportunity to talk to Russ Smith, who was the sole observer and first responder to John's accident. He confirmed the side-to-side action of the trike wing on short final which led to the slipping full-power impact on the runway. Russ attempted to resusitate to no avail.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 3 months ago
    Wow, sounds like a PIO at high speed on an Arrow. I have actually done that myself on that Wing and not on purpose and not that long ago. It’s unlike other PIOs because of the slipping and skidding. With a little practice and understanding of the Wing it’s not an issue, but those first few minutes can be fatal. This is one of the scenarios I tried to reproduce on the new M3 with the new XRS that replaced the Arrow S. It won’t even come close to going there. I can see how this accident may have happened.
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 2 months ago
    Thanks Doug, that makes sense.

    The new Airborne wing is almost exactly an Arrow with winglets...
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 2 months ago
    Good to know Airborne is on top of this!
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 2 months ago
    But that’s all it needed, with some anhedral to compensate for the stiffer handling that winglets cause. The increased anhedral and winglets seemed to increase the energy retention as well. Airborne said not really, but I felt it did, although I didn’t Fly both wings back to back.
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 2 months ago
    Winglets reduce drag through controlling the wingtip vortices, so I'm not sure how Airborne would not recognize the increased energy retention. Vortex Lift is an integral part of our aerodynamics.
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 2 months ago
    The bare Arrow is pretty good at holding energy. I prefer to fly the Arrow on the forward keel hole and with a touch of reflex on the tip battens to trim it fast, and this makes the other offerings seem a bit less lively to me.

    While an Arrow does need a little understanding, it feels a lot nicer to me without winglets, and nicer than the XRS. There seems to be no free lunch, sadly.
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 2 months ago
    I've enjoyed training four pilots to the Sport Pilot level on a Streak 3, SST, and an Arrow wings with no problems in control noted, and they've all enjoyed them afterwards, as well. This includes bank angles up to 60 degrees, Lazy Eights, and Spiral Recovery techniques. Some maneuvers were allowed to get sloppy for learning opportunities; and all were equipped with BRS. I never had any reason to pause!
  • Bryan Tuffnell
    by Bryan Tuffnell 2 months ago
    I am pleased to hear that, Doug.

    I believe that the Arrow wing has a behaviour that every pilot who flies one needs to understand, but I also believe that any properly trained pilot can fly a standard Arrow safely. Proper training is important for us all, regardless of what we fly.

    I made a couple of enquiries when I was first considering flying wingsuits. The first instructor I spoke to told me I needed 200 logged skydives before beginning wingsuit training. The second instructor said that he required at least 200 skydives and probably more, and he wanted to see me confidently dealing with a range of skydiving problems both real and simulated, and he wanted to feel that I had solid in-the-air skills before he handed me a wingsuit. He also laid out a progression plan for learning, and who to go to for further training for BASE jumping. Because that second instructor was very clear about all the skills required to deal with potential problems that might come up when in the air, without in any way dulling the joys of both flying and learning, he was the one that interested me, and I thought I'd leave his tender care with a better range of skills to keep me alive. I think both types of instructors are present in trike flying too - the 'I'll get you flying solo and passing the test' type and the 'here's the full range of skills you need to stay safe' type. I believe that a good instructor should demand that their students are comfortable with a full range of maneuvers before going solo. I think Lazy Eights going to 60 degrees in roll and +/- 30 in pitch is a great exercise that every pilot should be completely comfortable with.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 2 months ago
    Doug thanks for the update. It supports what other have said and the handling characteristics of the arrow. When the Arrow first came out I was flying it in Hawaii and it took some figuring out and I got to really love flying it. It was a huge performance improvement over the Streak 3. We got to fly side by side and jet by the streak with exactly the same airborne trike carriage. The new Airborne M3 with the new wing is rock solid with both winglets and much larger wheel vertical stabelizers AND the offset thrust line
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