Delivery Flight in My New Revo -- The Actual Trip!!!

Published by: Glade Montgomery on 9th Feb 2013 | View all blogs by Glade Montgomery
Tomorrow morning I catch a 5:15 am flight from Seattle to Tampa.   I'll have dinner in Tampa with friends, then head to Zephyrhills.   With first light Monday morning (or perhaps a little sooner), I'll be at Larry's hangar, eager to begin final preps -- for the long ride home -- in my new Revo.

I plan to make posts here, at least each evening if circumstances permit, describing my progress.  Y'all are welcome to direct-track my progress at this site:

https://share.delorme.com/GladeRoss

So long as the DeLorme InReach device is working as intended (and, of course, assuming I remember to turn it on), there should be position updates (including velocity and altitude) once every two minutes.

Comments

114 Comments

  • Fred Snyder
    by Fred Snyder 4 years ago
    Have a safe trip!
  • Vince  Morson
    by Vince Morson 4 years ago
    awesome Glade- We'll be watching your progress and saying some prayers for you- Vince
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Thanks guys.

    I was up at about 1:30 this morning. A bit earlier than needed to catch my flight from SeaTac, but I had so many thoughts going through my head, I couldn't sleep anyway, so I turned to some added preps. Caught the flight with a layover in Phoenix. Ironically (and unusually) this took me over at least a rough approximation of the same path I'll take back under my own pilotage (I end up flying to Florida quite a bit for business, and layovers are usually at other locations, such as Chicago, Denver or Dallas; so it was cool this one happened to dogleg just about the same way I plan to do in reverse on the way back). It was beautiful and clear until about central Texas, when clouds began.

    I had a great Cuban dinner with my friends in Tampa, then drove to Zephyrhills. I'd thought I'd likely be checking right into my hotel and show up at Evolution Trikes first thing in the morning. However, it was only 8:00, so I went to the airport instead to see if some of the group might still be hanging out. Oh yeah! The full group was there, and Larry was actively doing stuff on my Revo as I walked in.

    Originally I'd asked for non-standard graphics on my trike, and it turned out my choice was poor. My graphics design did not pop. When leaving after my last visit, I'd asked Larry and Amy to use their artistic flair for a redo. I'd seen no advance pictures, and my first reaction on seeing the re-do was "Oh wow!."

    In fact, it was not just the graphics. When I was here three weeks ago I was flying a temporary wing, because Larry's brand new Rival design (as spec'd for my trike) had not yet been ready. Among other things, the temp wing was not the right color. Now my trike had the wing made for it (solid black). That, combined with the new graphics, has exactly the stunning look I'd been hoping for. I'll post a picture I quickly snapped (sadly it does not show the wing), and do others later.

    I was feeling anxious to fly, but it was dark and I figured I'd need to wait until morning. However, Wes Frey (among many others) was there (who is licensed to night fly), and Larry all but insisted we go up immediately. We did. It was awesome. I love that wing. It's just what I wanted. It takes just a very light touch, and the wing does exactly what you want it to do. With two up, hands-off trim could be adjusted between about 85 and 62. At the higher end, I decided to pull a bit on the bar to try some greater speed. Very quickly' we were at 106 mph (Vne is 110). I've never gone so fast in a trike before. Yet it was rock steady. Didn't even sound fast.

    I again marvel at the efficiency of the 912iS. Wes and I took off with about 3.5 gallons. When we got back Larry indicated he'd been feeling a bit upset with us, out of fear we'd had it up so long as to run out of fuel. Nah. We'd hardly used any. Another real cool thing: at cruising RPM it sounds and feels as though your are barely above idle. Yeah, I like it.
  • Bill Magness
    by Bill Magness 4 years ago
    Glade,
    If you happen to stop in Houston, I have space in my hanger to keep your trike over night.
  • Chuck Burgoon
    by Chuck Burgoon 4 years ago
    Bill, Where are you at these days? I'm at RWJ on the east side and fly at Anuhauc most weekends (and have a hanger there too).

    Chuck
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Thanks Bill. I might take you up on it.

    Sorry, to anyone who's reading, that I did not report last night. I'm still in Z-Hills, still working to get all in readiness. It's been a lot to do, and I've been flying a lot. Also, my path northward has been blocked with weather regardless. I'd explain more, but it's late and I'm dead tired.
  • Doug Boyle
    by Doug Boyle 4 years ago
    Good luck Glade, The weather suxs in Fl for the next few days. Did Rotax furnish the fix on the throttle response?
  • Lee Schmitt
    by Lee Schmitt 4 years ago
    i have a hangar and accommodations for you in Talladega,AL KASN if needed
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Thank you Lee. I'd love to meet you, as well.

    Last night, via online checks, I thought this morning looked like a "go" for departure. However, I talked to a flight briefer who was very pessimistic. Checking now, however, it does indeed look good. So I'm a headin' out.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I did it!

    I started the trip.

    After the post this morning, I picked up some last-minute provisions, turned in my rental car, packed all my gear, filed a flight plan, and off I went.

    First leg was from Zephy (KZPH) to Perry-Foley (K40J), 154 miles. I got off right at 9:30 am (would have been earlier had I been expecting the weather would be okay today, but it was not expected).

    Speaking of "okay," well, it was okay -- just as anticipated after examining this morning and talking to the briefer. It's not to say it was wonderful. On that first leg, I was bucking a dead-on headwind (okay, almost dead-on) between 30 and 40 mph. I was flying at prox 3000 feet, between a layer that was broken a bit below me and a solid layer above. There was occasional light precip, but it was smooth air and good visibility generally.

    I found the Revo dialed-in beautifully for a hands-off cruise of 84 mph, at 4650 rpm while consuming 2.9 gph. I could go even faster with a little pull-in pressure and somewhat higher rpms, which I spent a fair amount of time doing, given the stiff headwind (in my old Buggy I'd have been almost going backward).

    At Perry-Foley (and after filling up), I went into the pilot's lounge and plotted my next leg, to Brewton, AL (K12J), a hop of 218 miles. The same weather pattern continued until 60 miles shy of Brewton, where finally it opened up (as expected) to broad, broad wide-open sky. My, it was good to see the sun and blue again. Oh, the headwind continued too, but did not go away with the clouds. On this leg it varied from 40 to 60 mph (mostly at the higher end), but at least it was not dead-on (it was off my right quarter).

    Upon landing at Brewton and pulling up to the fueling area, I was greeted by a nice gal; she and her husband somewhat run the place. They had a nice lounge where I did further planning, plus put on more warm gear. I'd not started from Zephyr (where it was very warm) with my full complement of warmies. I arrived at Perry-Foley thoroughly chilled, and used the privacy of the restroom to put on more electrics underneath my outerwear.

    I proceeded from Brewton with intent to reach Hattiesburg-Laurel in Mississipi (KPIB, 137 miles distant), where I planned to spend the night. However, the same headwind continued, and as I watched a beautiful, clear-air sunset, I realized I was not going to reach the intended destination within legal flying hours. I quickly plotted an alternate at Jackson, AL (4R3), turned my path about 15 degrees northward from where it had been, and landed well before the end of evening civil twilight.

    This airport is tucked away, has just a few hangars and a nice pilot lounge, where I am spending the night (in fact, it's where I'm typing right now). It's large, and looks like a nice cabin from the outside. There is a "Pilot's Emergency Code" lock on the door, so I dialed in that "secret" and helped myself in. Tons of space. There's a kitchen, couch, bathroom, TV and even wifi. All for the price of -- oh wait -- not a thing. It's great to be a pilot. I'm the only one at the entire airport.

    All in all it was a great day. I made 429 miles good (would have been 509 had I not ran out of daylight), in spite of a late start and terrible headwinds. I am anxious to see how tomorrow goes. It will be nice if headwinds are not so bad. If I don't sleep in, I should be off shortly after first light.

    BTW, it's a beautiful night here. Super-clear sky with stars and a crescent moon.
  • Herman Eldering
    by Herman Eldering 4 years ago
    Glade, great story and oh how I wish there were the facilities you have. No hope of getting a free lounge and facilities like you have in Australia which is why very few of us do the sort of long trips you are on. Look forward to following your adventures and spending 2 days with Larry Mednick next week when he checks out our Revos down under!
  • Herman Eldering
    by Herman Eldering 4 years ago
    The DeLorme is working perfectly and the info is very informative. Can you just detail your planned route and expected mileage each day?
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Glade: Congrats. Fly safe and don't take chances with weather. 2.9 GPH is not even 50% power so you can push it a bit. Rotax has got a zero degree dog in the gearbox instead of the usual 30 degrees they had in 912ULS. The reason is that the play confuses the computer and messes up the spark timing possibly. The bad side is it can allow rattle of the gearbox in the lower RPM range for a small period of time before it smoothes out. Let me know if you notice this phenomenon in transitioning from the lower to higher RPM range on the 912iS.
  • Jan Ferreira
    by Jan Ferreira 4 years ago
    Great report, I was following you today on Delorme and saw you had a stiff head wind. I will be watching you tomorrow again. Safe flying.
  • John Williams
    by John Williams 4 years ago
    Glade: Great first day! You covered a good bit of ground. The next few days, when looking at the prog charts, should offer you some great flying weather. Enjoy your journey, take some photos, and fly within your capabilities. As a fellow long distance ocean sailor, and long distance motorcycle rider, I know that you are content to put in many hours in the saddle. Remember to have fun along the way. Best wishes, JDW
  • Brad Courson
    by Brad Courson 4 years ago
    Glade,
    I have hangar space and accommodations at KCDH (Camden Arkansas..southwest portion). I am a transplant from Tacoma-Olympia.
  • Michael Kocot
    by Michael Kocot 4 years ago
    Great first day and a half. Fly safe Glade and stay warm.
  • Todd Ware
    by Todd Ware 4 years ago
    Glade,
    So excited for you . . . and of course jealous! Wish I were flying along side. An epic journey ahead.
    Rather than say "fly safe" which can be a rather nebulous concept . . . will just say 'manage the risks and hazards with lucidity'.
    Oh . . . and drink more water than usual! Will be looking for your posts, Flyboy.
  • B  Alvarius
    by B Alvarius 4 years ago
    Glade:
    Glad to here the flight is off to a good start. Look forward to more updates as you progress.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Thanks for the continuing encouragement, guys, and thank you, Brad, for the hangar offer. I'd like to take up all the guys who've offered, but so long as the weather, personal fitness and equpment permit me to continue, I'm working to make a beeline for home. It would be nice to take it more leisurely, but business beckons.

    I arrived at Mt. Pleasant, TX (KOSA) about an hour ago. This airport is a great and thriving place, where tenants have several awesome restored classics (better than a museum). Total opposite of the "GA's-heyday-was-in-the-past" feeling you get at so many places. I was greeted by Butch, who took me to a massive and pristine hangar to park for the night, and shuttled me back to the main terminal to hand me the keys to a courtesy car.

    I'm now enjoying real luxury at a Candlewood Suites (just had a shower, thank goodness; oh, and there was a flier's discount). Shortly, I'll drive over to Walmart for some supplies (practically across the street), then have dinner at a Chili's right next door.

    Today's trip was good, though it featured about the same headwinds as yesterday (in the fifties, and coming from about 2:00 O'clock). Turbulence was somewhat nasty below 4500 feet, but not bad otherwise. It was cold. I also made it through my second cold-front. Again a bit of light precip. Nothing terrible.

    I did not get away from Jackson as early as hoped. At first light, there were fog banks at each end of the airport. I made it off at about 8:15, pointed for Winsboro, LA (KF89). I'd not gone too far when I realized I'd not extracted my smartphone from whichever pocket I'd happened to stick it in while otherwise packing the plane (with all the layers there are many possibilities). I diverted to Waynesboro, MS (2R0), solely to stop and extract my phone, making for a first leg today of 45 miles.

    I then proceeded on to Winsboro, which was now just 183 miles further. Sadly, their self-serve gas system was out-of-service. I had plenty of fuel left to make it to another airport within, say, 30 or 40 miles (while still leaving a reasonable reserve), but all such near candidates were in the wrong direction. The nearest next candidate on my route was Ruston, LA (KRSN), 59 miles distant, and that distance would have cut seriously into my reserve. Fortunately, one of the onlookers (everywhere I land they gather) offered me 5 gallons he'd just drained form his plane in prep for some weight and balance work. So, we transferred that, I paid him $25, and I was off to Ruston.

    Ruston was a very nice airport. A ramp guy greeted me and directed me (waving orange batons, etc.) to a tiedown/parking spot, and immediately a fuel truck was there to re-fuel me. After that stop it was 144 miles onward to where I'm at now. There was sufficeint light (another two hours) to go further, but I was tired, and had ascertained good facilities were here, so here I am.

    All in all, it makes four legs for today, and a total of 429 miles. Dang headwind! My airspeed has averaged about 88 mph. Ground speed less than 60.
  • Jan Ferreira
    by Jan Ferreira 4 years ago
    Glade, nice going, I kept and eye on you while at work, very interesting. I must say you fly damn straight, I fly roads (IFR)
  • Peter Del Vecho
    by Peter Del Vecho 4 years ago
    Nice going Glade. It really is fun to check your delorme during the day to see your progress, altitude and groundspeed. Very interesting to read your posts too. I am sure you are very tired while writing them, so thanks for keeping us all posted.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Glade: Great going. Good with headwinds you can average 88 mph IAS or you'd be back further. Hopefully you will get some tailwinds soon.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 years ago
    Glade,
    Great work and everyone appreciates the adventure. As before, welcome to stop in Reno/Carson/Tahoe if it works. I know how the mission dictates specific route.
    best,
    Paul Hamilton
  • Vince  Morson
    by Vince Morson 4 years ago
    Awesome Glade- you're making WA state trikers proud!!! I couldn't wait to get on the site tonight to see where you made it to. THanks for taking the time to do the blog- I know it's probably gonna be the last thing you feel like doing at the end of a long day but we appreciate it. I can hardly wait til the movie comes out- how about "Long Way Home?"
  • Uwe Goehl
    by Uwe Goehl 4 years ago
    I have to echo Todd's sentiments. What a fantastic journey you are on! I hope to do something very similar some day (albeit, preferably during a warmer time of the year)! Safe flying!
  • Kael Rowan
    by Kael Rowan 4 years ago
    I also have to echo everyone else's comments. I love reading about your adventure and watching the delorme tracker site. I'm jealous! :)
  • George B
    by George B 4 years ago
    Hi Glade, Thanks for the updates on your trip. Sounds like your off to a great start and have seen some warm hospitality so far. It is good to be a pilot !!! I'll be eagerly monitoring your progress on the DeLorme site... so glad you have this onboard ! I flew yesterday and thought of you which led me to check the TP site to find your journey is underway. I'll look forward to meeting you and flying together once your back in WA. Wishing you all the best !
  • Fred Snyder
    by Fred Snyder 4 years ago
    Hi Glade, What a great adventure. Thanks for posting the updates and the track on delorme, looks like you're making great progress. Good luck and have a fun safe flight!
  • Mike-in- Thailand
    by Mike-in- Thailand 4 years ago
    Hi Glade - great trip. These headwinds sound odd, have you had your ASI calibrated? Maybe it's over reading and the headwinds aren't that bad ...... just a thought.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    It was a good day today. I did not get as far as planned, but did not do bad, regardless, considering nasty headwinds continued.

    I was off from Mt. Pleasant, TX (KOSA) with the sun's rising. There were cloud layers for perhaps the first hour, then it broke into beautiful, perfect, crystal-clear air which continued, for the entire day. My first leg was planned for Kickapoo (KCWC), which should have been an easy reach at 211 miles -- if the headwind had turned as predicted. It did not, so I diverted for Bowie, TX (K0F2), at 166 miles. However, a little while after the slight turn in Bowie's direction the headwind lessened slightly, and new calculations said I could indeed reach Kickapoo with full reserve remaining. So I veered back in Kickapoo's direction (these are only slight turns in direction, if you are wondering). Not long after doing so, a light began flashing from the 912iS ECU system. I knew from the manual that a flashing light means you should pay attention as soon as you can reasonably get to it (or something like that), while a steady light means you should land at the nearest available airport. Nevertheless, I wanted to check immediately, and so diverted back to Bowie, where I landed several minutes later.

    This flashing light had arisen a few times while testing in Zephyr. Evidently, it's happening on several 912iS's. For me, it only happened previously during full throttle at takeoff, and went away on cycling of the iS's nearest equivalent to mags. Also, I was never formerly able to detect anything abnormal in the gauges when it occurred. This time it happened at cruise, and I observed that the EGT on cylinder 3 was below normal. After landing I called Larry's Dad, Phil, who is an expert in many things. He indicated that high EGT would be a major concern, but somewhat lower than normal was less so. I decided to continue. Happily, the cylinder returned to normal temp. There were one or two further interludes where it's temp momentarily went low, but otherwise it has continued fine.

    This next leg was from Bowie to Childress (KCDS), at 155 miles. I refilled my tank there, and worked to determine where to fly on my last leg of the day. It was a contest between Hereford, TX (KHRX), at 129 miles, which I could reach easily (for sake of getting a hangar) before closing time at 5:00, or Tucumcari, NM (KTCC), which was destined to be a stretch (headwinds continuing) at 189 miles. I called ahead, and both offered hangar space and a courtesy car. Given that it was already about 2:00 pm (and with the headwinds I was doing about 55 mph GS), I decided to make for Hereford (dang, two nights without advancing even a single state, even if Texas IS huge).

    Well, as I traveled, the headwind lessened slightly, and I calculated that with a lot of constant muscle pulling on the bar (for ASI of 90 mph for pretty much the whole distance), I could make Tucumcari before 5:00. Thus, I so changed my path (again, these are only slight angle changes when done from afar).

    During this leg (while I'm straining muscles for maximum speed, plus coping with turbulence as present because I'm maintaining between one and two-thousand feet AGL so headwinds are less severe), I sensed the ground altitude below me beginning to rise, and the scenery finally became spectacular. I'm talking really spectacular. I entered sort of a mini-grand canyon, with swept river valleys extending below. Colors galore. There was a shelf/rise (with red cliffs, and such), then a plateau at about 4000 feet ground level that stretched forever in every direction. I do mean forever. Remember, the air was crystal clear. If you've been on the open ocean in perfect clarity, you know how it looks to see ocean as far as the eye can behold in every direction. But this was from a couple of thousand feet AGL, and it was all perfectly-flat, checker-boarded farmland. I loved it. I positively loved it. After an hour or so of flying, this high flat plateau broke to another canyon. And not too much further beyond lurked my destination for the night, Tucumcari (I make it by about 4:40).

    Oh, I had a major scare. No, I'm not talking life and death. As that first spectacular vista opened up, I decided I had to have a picture. Insert confession. I equipped myself with video equipment to do a first rate video job, but I'd not found time to fully set it up before leaving. Additionally, it's turned out the demands of flying itself are so great and concentrated I do not want to dilute safety by focusing my limited attentions on less safety-critical elements. In consequence, I've done no more than setup one camera each morning. It runs as long as it runs, and there is no more. So, by this time in the day I'm certain that one camera is no longer running, and the scene is so spectacular I have to have a picture. I reach for my smartphone (which incidentally provides data for my other devices), which is tethered via power supply to the left of the center console. The power supply is short, so I disconnect and lift the smartphone with intent to use as camera. But there is too much turbulence. My hands (and muscles) are too busy with the control bar (plus it's rather clumsy while attempting to handle a tiny smartphone while wearing winter gloves over heated liners), so I abort the effort and set the phone back on the Revo's stand-on floor (to the left of the console behind my left leg). It is not immediately re-tethered to power cable. I resume attention on driving, and a minute or two later look down for my phone.

    It's not there!

    Horror.

    I am picturing it tumbling through the air behind me.

    I don't know how it could have happened. The Revo nose and windshield are so effective, this area encounters all but zero wind. There is hardly even any turbulence there, and this stand-on floor area is essentially walled (it's not a high wall, but it's a wall). I don't know how, but in the circumstances I must have somehow set it down in a very bad manner, and somehow it must have gone tumbling.

    Damn! This is bad. A major wrench in the works (not to mention a pretty expensive phone). And I'm thinking about factors such as my worrying mom will try to call me, not get me, and think I've been killed. I can't worry her like that. I'm picturing the phone landing somewhere down there in farmland, perhaps embedded in grass or sage. I keep looking in that floor area, hoping it's there and I've missed seeing it, but, no, it's gone. I can't understand how it escaped, but it's evident it did.

    But I look once more. Lo and behold, it's there. It's vertically inclined up against where the composite structure rises from the floor toward my seat. Eureka. Salvation!

    Anyhow, I count 510 miles for the day. I'm a bit over half way.
  • Rizwan Bukhari
    by Rizwan Bukhari 4 years ago
    Very nice, Glade did you try to change your altitutde when you were facing the strong headwinds. I could have swore that I read this in either in the Freedom flight or Brian Milton's book (when he flew around the world in a trike) that when he was faced with strong winds, he would try to climb to a different altitude and sometimes he would actually get tail winds or the head winds wouldn't be so strong. It might not work but worth a shot.
  • Fred Snyder
    by Fred Snyder 4 years ago
    Hi Glade, great trip so far you are headed into some of the most beautiful country that I have ever seen. Have fun!! Looking forward to your next update!
  • B  Alvarius
    by B Alvarius 4 years ago
    Welcome to New Mexico.
  • John Williams
    by John Williams 4 years ago
    Glade: We are cheering for you. I just saw that you took off from Santa Fe, NM, headed on your way. You are making fantastic time. Keep making good decisions about - fly / no fly - Looks like a little frontal system is passing through Northern AZ & NM. After that front passes through, a high pressure will control. That should give you good flying for another few days. Needless to say, I'm sitting in Virginia making assumptions about the weather from looking at the prog charts and you are on the spot making your decisions. Please continue to make sure that you are well rested, fed, and prepared for another day in the saddle. We are all rooting for your success and well being. Warm regards, JDW
  • John Young
    by John Young 4 years ago
    Nice one Glade. Only some 1,200 miles to go.

    Fly safe. Blue skies and tail winds.

    Regards, John
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Today was a disappointing day. It was beautiful, clear, gorgeous and stunning. But oh, the headwind, and turbulence too.

    I got off from Tucamcari a little later than hoped (about an hour after sunup instead of right at). My plan was to stop first in Santa Fe (KSAF), after 149 miles, then Chinle, AZ (E91), after another 199, and finally Page, AZ (KPGA), just 118 miles further. This would have me poised to do the Grand Canyon on my first leg tomorrow.

    The flight from Tucumcari to Santa Fe was perfect (the headwind was not unreasonably severe), and also held a nice surprise. I had not advance-noticed that Santa Fe is a controlled airport. I noticed from about 35 miles out, however, when examining details on the airport. I quickly brushed up on the basics I'd learned, and did the "tower-talk" thing just fine. Even remembered to state which "information" I had. It was my first towered entry and exit since getting my endorsement with Wes Frey back in Zephyr.

    After fuel-up, I proceeded onward for Chinle. I had to climb pretty steep to clear a high ridge of mountains. I went to about 12,700 feet, and I believe I could have legally gone even higher under the rule that allows sport pilots to clear obstacles by 2000 feet. After the ridge I stayed high for a while enjoying the smooth ride. There were a few minutes when the headwind almost ceased. I saw groundspeeds in the the high seventies, and for a brief moment saw 81 (I was at hands-off fast trim with airspeed of 85). It's the first on trip I've seen ground speed so near my airspeed. Alas, it ended, and turned to extreme headwinds, and extreme turbulence. I tried varying altitudes (as I have indeed on other occasions, in some instances finding significant benefit nearer to the ground), but in this instance it was to no avail.

    Oh well. 199 miles is not a big distance for the Revo. Even with a large headwind, it's easily within range. Except the headwind kept getting worse. By the time I reached the middle of that 199 mile stretch, calculations indicated I could indeed still reach Chinle (assuming headwinds did not become even more severe), but it would be with only about 30 minutes of fuel held in reserve, instead of the hour that I've commited myself to treat as untouchable absent circumstances that leave me positively no choice. Given this, I veered 35 degrees to the left, for my planned alternate, Gallup, NM (KGUP).

    At the point where I turned, Gallup was 53 miles distant, as compared to 99 for Chinle. So it would seem it was a logical choice when one is concerned with fuel range. However, it turns out my temporary EFIS has not been correctly calibrated to show true wind direction. Because of this, I was not aware that the wind I'd been bucking was coming significantly more from Gallup's direction, then from Chinle's (somehere from within the V, I think, but more on Gallup's side). Thus, the turn pointed me even more directly into that high velocity air. It was so bad I began worrying if I'd have range to reach Gallup. Please bear in mind, this is wilderness. Runways are few and far between. While pulling in the bar to maximize my speed against the onslought, I was watching TASs of 104 and simultaneous GSs of 42. Yes, the air mass s setting me back at 62 mph, as I try to move forward though it. And the turbulence is terrible. I'm fighting like mad to keep things stable. And, BTW, it's all in perfectly clear air.

    I re-calculate every few minutes, and each time it's evident I'll make it fine (there was one little ranch runway I could have turned back to if not), even if with less cushion than I like. I have to climb high again to clear a ridge, and for a while it seems like the baby doesn't want to climb. I'm sure it was a combination of the high altitude, high density altitude, and downdraft on that side of the ridge. Ultimately we started lifting more normally, but it was a weird feeling when the reluctance to climb was first encountered.

    Landed on Gallup's 24, with wind at 220, 21 knots and gusting to 29. I touched down at about 30 mph and rolled 25 feet (or so it felt). At this point, fulfillling my original plans for the day (making it to Page, AZ) was out of the question. With a quick fuel-up I could have easily made Chinle before dark, but Gallup does not have self-service, and the fuel truck took forever getting to me. By the time I was re-fueled, I knew that if proceeding to Chinle I'd be fearing the setting sun as I approached. On top of that, I did not relish again facing the extreme turbulence and slow forward progress that so prevailed this afternoon. So, I am in New Mexico for a second night. It's the first state that has so claimed me. Not even Texas did (one night only, there, at wonderful Mt. Pleasant).

    I am a little annoyed with the airport here. You can only take their courtesy car for an hour, which means you can't use it go to your hotel, spend the night, and return in the morning. And they charge for hangar use. Not only do they charge; it's unreasonably high at $60. If it was not so customary among so many other airports to be so much more gracious, I guess I'd not mind. But when you get used to treatment that is so much nicer, its absence grinds.

    And of course there's the fact my total distance made-good today was only 302 miles. Had I been going in the opposite direction, I likely could have done a thousand. Dang wind!
  • Kael Rowan
    by Kael Rowan 4 years ago
    Thanks again for the update Glade! I actually happened to glance at your Delorme today right about the time you changed course to the southwest, and thought to myself "wow, it's the first time he's not flying in a strict straight line - maybe he finally decided to see some sights!" Too bad it wasn't actually for fun after all...

    I have a question for ya: how often do you enable the aux fuel pump? (The one with the switch next to Avionics)

    And 12,700ft - wow! Did you get light headed?
  • Jan Ferreira
    by Jan Ferreira 4 years ago
    Glade, I was also tracking you and figured you are aiming at Page, but when I saw your ground speed I knew you would not make it in in one day. I had to guess where you will be going after you clear those high ridges. When I saw you make the left turn and saw your ground speed dropping I saw you had a hard time making headway. Anyway, good adventure and enjoy it while we are watching...:>) You are making good decisions, keep it going I will be watching tomorrow. Good luck and safe flight.
  • Lee Schmitt
    by Lee Schmitt 4 years ago
    Glade, the headwinds are a bummer but i think you are doing great and i bet you need the rest. i'm glad you are not "pushing it" to make up for the headwinds. Keep making the safe decisions.
  • Vince  Morson
    by Vince Morson 4 years ago
    How dare those guys limit their generous donation of a vehicle to one measly hour- man- I'm NEVER going to that airport LOL Hey we're rootin and praying for you in your home town of Shelton Glade- hope the headwinds settle down a bit for you tomorrow- good work choosing alternates and making decisions on the fly. This trip is growing you into a pilot that you could never be by flying the local area for even 10 years. Of course, what can be bigger and better than this but trans-continental? Maybe a trip over to Mike in Thailand next year!!!!!! Thanks for the continued updates- Vince
  • Karey Love
    by Karey Love 4 years ago
    Glade, Ya Hoo! What an adventure you're having. Thanks for sharing the details including the DeLorme flight path service we follow. I think that Gallup's (apparent) greed is usually offset by the generosity of most airports I've visited on my yearly fly-abouts. So many times we have been offered free hangar space, free courtesy cars, use of the couch for an overnight camp spot and use of gas cans and even chauffeured trips to the parts store and cafe. I think airports for us "little guys" is an underused gem. A perk for a perp?
  • B  Alvarius
    by B Alvarius 4 years ago
    Glade

    Glad to here you made your alternate. Northern New Mexico and Arizona are truely beautiful places to fly. Enjoy the scenery.
  • Mar W
    by Mar W 4 years ago
    Would love to see some pictures when time permits...
    So jealous...Sounds like an amazing trip!
    All the best! :)
  • Jan Ferreira
    by Jan Ferreira 4 years ago
    Glade, I was wondering and checking all the time where you were flying and guessing where you are going to land next. How about giving your planned route for the next day? It will be nice to look in advance where you are aiming. Great flight today, more than 500 miles.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    It was a great day, and I'm beat.

    I think one or two people predicted this would be an adventure. It has been.

    I was determined to be in the air before sunup today. At about 5:45, I called the airport and asked one of the night crew to come pick me up, and he did (even though the gal from yesterday said they're not supposed to, and that I'd have to wait until 7:00). I re-packed all my stuff, did the pre-flight, got in and strapped, started the engine, and began donning gloves. One of my heated liners was missing. Oh no. I turned off the engine to see if it had fallen on the hangar floor. No. I decided, for that hand, I'd have to make do with wearing, as a pseudo-liner, a thin glove from a pair I'd bought to use for warmer flying. Not good, but I figured I could keep that hand wind-sheltered most of the time. So, I geared up in such fashion and -- guess what?

    The engine would not re-start. It's the second time it's done this. Both times, when shut off after recently running, it would crank and crank, but not start. Pretty maddening for a state-of-the-art engine. I waited 15 or 20 minutes, and tried again. It still just cranked. After many tries I was worried about depleting the battery, and wondered if maybe at this point part of the problem was, with the battery already somewhat depleted, it was not cranking at full speed. I thought of asking the aiport guy if he had a jumper cable setup, but on the Revo it requires some disassembly to get to the battery, and I did not want to do this. I thought of those "jumpers" you see advertised that go into the cigarrette lighter. Obviously, you can't do any serious jumping on this basis, but I figured whatever little added voltage as might be provided could not hurt. So, I borrowed the "one-hour-only" courtesy car and went to Walmart. No dice. I then went to Pep Boys and got what I was looking for, and drove back to the airport (it was well after 8:00 now). Before doing anything with the new acquisition, I tried the start again. It worked, and I was off.

    Last night, given the delay as described yesterday, I re-formulated my plans. Instead of going up through Page then down across the Grand Canyon, I decided instead to fly straight to Grand Canyon Airport, which is on the south rim of the canyon, from there to Jean, NV, and finally to Mojave airport in California. This plan also had me regrettably skipping Death Valley, but I can't be at this forever (still have a business to run, employees that need leadership, and so on). Plus, I think my wife misses me (I know I'm missing her -- and my kids too).

    So, I'm in the air bound for the Grand Canyon, and I grab the remote control for my heated clothing, to turn the heat up. It's pretty nifty. It shows a light as you rotate the dial, but not otherwise. The light indicates it's received your request, and has transmitted to the actual switching device within the clothing. But, sadly (and for the first time), there is no light when I rotate. I guess the batteries in the device must have depleted. It's impossible for me to replace them in-flight, and I'm not turning around. I remember reading that the in-clothing device defaults at low or medium (or something) when there's no command from the controller. So, I realize that whatever that default is, that's what I'm getting until the next stop. That default, evidently, is not much. It was 31 degrees in the air, and I was miserably, miserably cold -- possibly colder than I've ever been.

    In the midst of being so cold, I enjoyed incredible vistas (got a bunch of video, too, which I promise to post eventually). Just amazing. Totally, awesomely amazing. And the headwinds were not so terrible. Just in the 30s.

    Going into Grand Canyon Airport was pretty cool. It was my second solo towered entry. It's a super active place. Tour planes and tour helicopters bustling about constantly. I got re-fueled, put new batteries in my clothing controller, got some warmth back into my body (a hot cup of coffee helped), and I as off again. Incredible vistas (and reasonable headwinds) continued. Wait'll you see the videos. Also, I was warm again, with the replaced batteries. Heated clothing (especially when turned high) makes more difference than you can imagine. I went high. There were some high obstacles. I think I topped out at about 13,700. The air was so nice and smooth. And thin. I made sure to limit my stay about 12,500 to less than 30 minutes.

    Speaking of thin, man, does it make a difference. Grand Canyon Airport lies at 6990 if I recall, and the DA was greater than that. I could not believe how long I rolled before gaining any air. And even when I got into float, that seemed to last forever before actual ascent began. And the ascent itself was crazy sluggish. I think I like thick air.

    I landed in Jean just after someone else crashed. I don't know what he did exactly, but there was a diagonal skid mark right in the touch-down area, and he was off on the side inspecting the damage. Not hurt, fortunately.

    In Jean I did some quick calculations to determine if there would be sufficient daylight for me to reach my intended-next destination, of Mojave. It would have been a slam-dunk if not for the delayed start this morning. As it was, I figured I could just make it if not for the military restricted areas that must be flown around. So, I picked Apple Valley airport instead, which was significantly more south than I wanted (and somewhat less distance gained, too). On top of that, the FBO was not promising hangar space when I called. But it was the best option I could come up with, given the press of time.

    So off I went from Jean, flying toward Apple Valley. And my speed was pretty good (at least by the standards of this trip). For a little while I was making ground speed in the high seventies, and it made me think maybe I could do better than Apple Valley. Maybe I could make Mojave after all. So, I'm looking and looking at the chart, and at the restricted areas I must skirt around. It would be pushing it, even assuming headwinds stayed as light as at the moment (only in the twenties). So, I looked to see what alternates might be if I was heading for Mojave and not making it. I found a perfect one, due south of Mojave (which was right on the necesary path anyway, given the skirting requirement): the General William J Fox airport in Lancaster. So, I pointed my nose for there (or, rather, for the skirting path around restricted areas that would take me there). It was a good flight, and my third solo entry into a tower-controlled space (very nice operator on the tower).

    It was after 6:00 when I got here (headwinds did get somewhat worse again). The airport info lists several FBOs, and I figured I could likely arrange a hangar with at least one of them, in spite of the time. The nice at guy at the tower sent me over to a place that had already closed. Then I connected with Kenneth at what's really the main FBO. He said they had some empty hangars, and suggested I follow with my trike as he drove his truck there. Would you believe, it would not start again!!!!!

    We ended up pushing it a quarter mile through howling wind (it does that here), only to discover none of the hangars, that were supposed to be empty, were empty. So, we pushed it back in front of the terminal, where I am now sitting on a couch in the lounge, typing. I'll spend the night right here. My Revo is very securely tied just outside, though rocking a bit in the wind.

    Good news is that I am now on the home stretch. I go north tomorrow, directly toward home. With decent luck, I should have one more night out. Of course, this assumes Rotax's latest and greates starts in the morning. Am I a little unhappy with Rotax? Yes, indeed I am.
  • Jake McGuire
    by Jake McGuire 4 years ago
    Sounds like you are on quite the adventure - these daily reports are great to read. Watch out for the weather tomorrow - visibility in the central valley was deteriorating noticeably today, and I think there's a lot of rain in the forecast.
  • Arthur Thompson
    by Arthur Thompson 4 years ago
    Glade,
    I have a Ford F-150 does the same thing as your 912 and is also fuel injected. Acts like a vapor lock but I truly don't know if a throttle body can vapor lock. If I hit the accellerator pump a few times the problem goes away and it only happens after the engine is warmed up. Been following you since Tampa Bay but did know about this site until Finski was here yesterday. Good news, the prevailing southwest winds will become tail winds from here on:-) Crummy wx for your fellow pilots at KSHN so expect to take the gorge route down the Columbia River to Portland if you stay inland and watch out for wires over the river and other airplanes. It can get a bit crowded in there!
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Glade:
    At this point you probably need to recharge your battery overnight to get it to full strength. If the engine does not start in about 3 or 4 go's, its not going to happen just by cranking more. Its useless. Rotax requires that you only do 10 seconds maximum crank and then a mandatory 2 minute cooling cycle or you will overheat the battery cable and possibly start a fire and that's the last thing you need. 912 series can pull a maximum of 80 amps on starting. That's a lot of amps for extended periods of time.
    You need to either give it 15 minutes before cranking again in case it was vapor lock (which I don't think it was in this case, both times it was cold morning initial starts) or more than likely your charging circuit is not working and putting enough juice in the circuit making the battery weak and not cranking the starting RPM needed to get going in cold morning. Look for loose or bad connection at the starter and the ground to the starter. That is another possible reason. Your fuel and air and spark in a fuel injection would be controlled by the computer as long as connections on the wires are good.
  • Kael Rowan
    by Kael Rowan 4 years ago
    Anyone else notice the Delorme still shows him at the airport? Either the Delorme is not working or his trike won't start again? :(
  • Jake McGuire
    by Jake McGuire 4 years ago
    The latest METAR from the Tehachapi pass may have something to do with it:

    KTSP 191815Z AUTO 32014G21KT M1/4SM FG OVC003 01/01 A2983 RMK AO2
  • Michael Kocot
    by Michael Kocot 4 years ago
    Lots of big rain to the north. Glad Glade is in no rush.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Jake, you got it right. I got up (from an airport-lounge couch) at about 5:30 this morning, and quickly plotted my intended route for the day (from here to KMAE, then O08, then KSIY). It would have had me almost to Oregon for the night (KSIY is but a little way south of the OR/CA border), and left a relatively short remaining distance to cover tomorrow, for the final stint home. I then called for a weather briefing, and it was not good. There's a front passing over the area.

    Basically, I need to do a short jump northwesterly over some relatively low-lying mountains between here and the south end of California's Central Valley, the latter of which is to be my northward corridor headed toward home. I could easily see from the westward viewing (and fully-glassed) lounge that there was clear air right over the tops of those mountains. The problem is the entire valley beyond is presently subject to a 3300 foot ceiling. Thus, I could fly over the mountaintops and above that ceiling, but I'd need to get down through and under it once I was there. Reports were that the ceiling was rather solid. There are nice and rather low passes to either side of the intervening barrier (which might present an opportunity to fly in under the cover), but reports indicated 200 foot ceilings within those passes. On top of that, right from my couch I could see rivers of clouds continuously overflowing through the passes, into this higher-altitude valley.

    I felt very anxious to make at least some progress. The METARS as concerning the valley itself were further north. I figured if at least I could "jump over the hill" and get to an airport at the valley's southern end, that would be good -- not only in that it would be some forward progress, but also based on the prospect of getting my Revo out of the intense wind and into a hangar. I called a series of airports over there, seeking to find if any could: (a) offer hangar space; and (b) see any nice and large holes in the cloud cover. I finally found an airport that offered the services I sought. However, all reported solid cloud cover. I called the weather briefing service a few times. They also were not encouraging on holes. FYI, I figured if I flew over there based on the prospect of holes, yet found none, it would be easy to fly back and land here again.

    Anyhow, it appeared there was just no practical (and appropriately safe) way to effectively get "over-the-hill," and there were no predictions for improvement over the course of the day, so I abandoned myself to being weather-stopped for the first time on this trip. Oh, I'd also checked for airports with available hangar space on this side of the "hill," and struck out there. So, immediately post-abandonment, I called the local FBO here, to see if possibly they could do better than last night in regard to hangar space. Turns out the office (of the guy I was talking to) is just down the hall from the lounge where I'm sitting, about 200 feet away, and a hangar had indeed opened up this morning. He sent out an employee to open it for me. They employee stopped at my trike while I got in to start it, and follow him.

    I figured, having had an entire night to rest, the Rotax should now start okay. On the first crank, it did not. This did not make me happy. But I thought of what Arthur said works for him on his F150. I pumped the foot throttle three times, then tried again. Blissfully, it growled to life (I love that throaty growl). I'm not sure if it was coincidence, or if it was indeed the throttle-pumping that made a difference. Assuming the latter, I thank you Arthur.

    Also I thank you, Abid, for your information. I do limit cranking incidents to just 2 or 3 seconds. I figure, if a fuel-injected engine does not catch in a given instance after that much time, it is not likely to do so within that instance. If you're wondering, I am also foot-off-throttle during attempts. I believe this is what's expected for virtually all fuel-injected engines. Given the trouble, I have tried once or twice with foot throttle on. It was not helpful.

    Anyhow, I've taken a bunch of stuff back to the plane (now happily ensconced in a hangar) that I'd not wanted to leave there while it was out in the wind. I'll call for a local hotel to come pick me shortly. I've continued here in the lounge for a while. The openness (and public environment) is somehow preferable (at least for a while) to the sense of being "holed-up" in the seclusion of a hotel room.
  • Dave Schultz
    by Dave Schultz 4 years ago
    Hi Glade!,
    I have enjoyed reading your posts. I agree with Abid about your battery. With all your electronics, heated clothing, and cold weather, I would guess that your battery is not fully charging. Wishing you the very best on your continued safe adventure.

    Dave
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I've been monitoring the battery, and it reads normally. The cranking speed also seems normal. The heated clothing indeed has a significant load. However, the 912iS has not one, but two generators. If I remember right, one is 15 amps and one is 35. I did notice, with the clothing full-on plus all of the aircraft lighting (including landing lights), in-flight voltage pulled down to about 12.4. Since noticing that, a few days ago, I've been sure to not simultaneously run both heated clothing and landing lights. If I'm not mistaken, I believe engine-running voltage ought to be more in the neighborhood of 12.9, or even high
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I've been monitoring the battery, and it reads normally. The cranking speed also seems normal. The heated clothing indeed has a significant load. However, the 912iS has not one, but two generators. If I remember right, one is 15 amps and one is 35. I did notice, with the clothing full-on plus all of the aircraft lighting (including landing lights), in-flight voltage pulled down to about 12.4. Since noticing that, a few days ago, I've been sure to not simultaneously run both heated clothing and landing lights. If I'm not mistaken, I believe engine-running voltage ought to be more in the neighborhood of 12.9, or even higher. I am maintaining between that and 13.2
  • Jake McGuire
    by Jake McGuire 4 years ago
    According to the Rotax manuals, the 912iS has two alternators - A and B. A is used to power engine electronics and B is used to charge the battery and power the aircraft. If alternator A fails, alternator B is used to power engine electronics and no longer powers aircraft instruments. Alternator B can provide 30A at 14V. 12.9V on the bus sounds low, mine is around 13.5V and drops down to 13.3V when I turn on my heated vest.

    The Rotax manuals also say that the battery has to provide 9V to the ECU at all times during engine startup - if it's not fully charging this might be your problem.
  • Jim Waters
    by Jim Waters 4 years ago
    Hi Glade, You seem to be stuck in about the same position that Kim Hurt and I were last Dec. We had been flying around the Las Vegas - Death Valley area parts of Oct, Nov, and Dec last year and decided to fly home to Petaluma, Ca.(O69) in early Dec. in our AC Clipper 912's. We diverted to Apple Valley, CA once we were in sight of Tehachapi pass and saw it was socked in. The next day we were able to make Tehachapi but couldn't get further as the valley was socked in. The following day we made it as far as Fresno before it became fogged in and were stuck there for 2 nites, no hangars, before finally making the last 200 miles home to O69.
    So what should have been a 2 day journey turned into 5. Of course we were only going about 550 miles total.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Glade:
    If you are seeing 12.4 volts on the EFIS and its even close to correct, you are barely charging your battery I think. You should be seeing something in excess of 13 volts (generally 13.8 Volts) at least for charging properly.
    35 amps is a lot of amps and you should have no issue whatsoever with the heated clothing pulling 9 or 10 amps for heating if the 35 amp circuit is the one powering the electronic stuff and your clothing and the 15 amp circuit was just charging your battery.
  • Arthur Thompson
    by Arthur Thompson 4 years ago
    Glade,
    Abid has it spot on. 13.2 volts is normally considered float voltage meaning that the battery is only being maintained but not charging. It will take at least 13.8 volts to begin charging the battery and many voltage regulators will show as much as 14.5 volts at full charge, even under the load of lights and other accessories. If you turn off all your accessories and just have the engine running and cannot get at least 13.8 volts then your charging system is not operating correctly or the battery itself is shorting internally creating a load so heavy that the alternator cannot keep up.
    If you get the 13.8 or more with accessories off, start turning them on one at a time until you find out what casuses the voltage to drop below 13.8. You may just have too many accessories for the alternator, a bad battery or a faulty regulator/alternator so it is important to eliminate as much as possible when you first start troubleshooting.
    One other thing you can check is the battery itself. Disconnect the ground lead and measure the voltage after it has rested for 15 minutes or so. 12.6 volts with no load at all is fullly charged. A dischared battery will be 12.2 volts or less, again with the battery ground wire disconnected. These numbers are for lead acid batteries but close enough for the other types to give you a good indication of your battery charge state.
  • Bill Magness
    by Bill Magness 4 years ago
    Glade
    If you are stuck another day, you might get a trickle charger with a lighter plug. I kep mine on it when in the hanger and seems to make the battery last longer.
    Bill
  • Vince  Morson
    by Vince Morson 4 years ago
    Hey Glade- Finski and I were thinking of alerting the local media to your accomplishment- would you be ok with that? Maybe have a couple of choice sound bites for them when you arrive?
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Hi Glade/Art:
    Correct. I have not used and measured stuff on your new EFIS and new wiring harness made for your Revo with new engine installation with new rectifier/regulator but I can tell you that in the standard Revo with Enigma and the length of wires and gauges of wires when you saw 12.8 Volts it was really 13.2 Volts. It was always an error of 0.4 Volts. Your new stuff, I have no idea about but its probably similar. Your battery is not really being replenished either way (12.8 volts) and it is slowly but surely then being discharged as you try cranking the engine. Of course this assumes what you have written above about voltages you see is correct and has been correct throughout your trip. You will have to figure this out once you get home and correct it.
    My really wild guess is your 15 amp charging circuit that in 912iS is supposed to be dedicated to battery re-charge is probably on the general power bus as well being utilized for other things when it should have been the other 35 amp bus that should have supplied power to that bus. Simple connections but you will need to know what you are looking at to change things around if this is true which by no means is certain that it is.
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 years ago
    a comment on the voltage reading. It is best to calibrate the enigma panel voltage reading. Get an accurate voltage reading with an accurate voltmeter. Compare this true reading with the enigma panel reading and go into setup and adjust the voltage on the enigma panel to read exactly the true voltage. Now at least you know where you are.

    I max out my 582 current draw with two pairs of gloves, two pairs of foot pads, and one vest. I run two vests with a temperature control which lowers the use. With the temperature controller on, the voltage bounces back and forth between 13 and 12 volts. Fully charging is 13.4 volts and I get 12 volts when the trike is not running. Overall, you should be OK to run a vest, gloves and foot warmers. For this you should be OK.

    Couple of days of north winds here in the west.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I'm now thoroughly "holed-up" in a nice hotel room, for what will apparently be a two-night stay. Had a nice shower yesterday afternoon, and even did laundry. From early-on yesterday, all the indications had been that my first good opportunity out would not be until Thursday, but, of course, I hoped for better. Checking early this morning, it was quickly evident my hope was in vain. However, the forecast for tomorrow indeed looks good.

    Based on this, I am spending this day doing remote work on my office computer. There is much to do, and I'm beginning some important business catch-up.

    At present, I thought I'd take a break from that, and bring readers here up-to-date. The bottom line is it looks like it will be a total of two days non-flying, before resuming again tomorrow.

    Since I have a little time now, I'll mention a few negatives I've encountered.

    The worst is this: Yesterday morning (still thinking I'd be flying) I went to switch to a fresh micro-SD card in my helmet cam. Horror of horrors! I discovered it had no card in it (evidently, while juggling cards and batteries the morning before, I'd unwittingly left it card-free). Thus, when departing from Gallup, NM that prior morning (for the epic journey across northern AZ with the Grand Canyon, and all), and when thinking during the course of that entire day I was capturing awesome video, I was in fact capturing nothing. At least nothing except as inscribed within my own brain synapses -- and those, unfortunately, are much more difficult to share. I am sorry everyone. I'll not be able to give you that video.

    Another significant negative occurred my second day out. It was the first day that I donned the full regalia of heated clothing (not just jacket-liner, but pant-liner, glove-liners and boot-liners too). During prior testing back home (and with but a single pair of normal socks between the liners and my skin), I'd found the heaters were uncomfortably hot on the tops of my feet. I figured there was a need, simply, for less intimacy between heaters and skin. So, I donned two wool socks on each foot under the liners (one of the sock pairs being very thick). Even so, I found the top-of-foot heat to be somewhat uncomfortable -- to such an extent I turned down the lower-section heat control in my setup, to a compromise position between wanting more heat for my legs but less for my feet (the setup allows one control for pants/feet and a different conrol for jacket/gloves).

    So, that night I got to my hotel, threw off my boots, then the boot liners, and then both sets of socks. Guess what I discovered on my bare feet? It was (actually still is) a perfect pattern of water blisters, precisely tracing the path of heated wires within the liners. Me thinks we have a serious consumer product safety issue here. Needless to say, I was surprised. I knew I was encountering a bit of discomfort. But doing real damage like that? I had no idea. It looks rather ugly, and is a might uncomfortable, to boot. I've been hoping the blisters would "deflate" faster than they have. They're a little less pressurized, finally, than they were for the first few days, but still (aside from one that broke open and is more painful for that reason), they are rather fully-filled. I'll have to discuss this, when I get back, with the parties the involved (manufacturer and retailer). In the meantime, I have (obviously) been flying sans boot liners. My feet have been cold in consequence, but it's better than worsened burns (the pod section on the Revo permits very little air flow in that region, else the coldness in my feet would have been much worse).

    A lot more serious discomfort has been in my right knee. I do not know why, but it does not like to be bent for long periods. After an hour or two (and for no apparent reason), it starts hurting, often very badly, demanding to be straightened or otherwise re-positioned. I've sometimes stuck that leg momentarily out into the airstream, so as to straighten the knee and provide some relief. It helps but briefly, and with a cost of depleting precious warmth. I've taken to consuming four Ibuprofens before beginning each two-to-three hour flight. It helps a little, but not a lot. I might chalk it up simply to the fact my knee is older than it used to be, but in the midst of the experience I'm reminded of having experienced exactly the same thing in instances going many years back, in each circumstance where this knee was likewise kept in similar positions for similar periods of time. It is a very major annoyance.

    So, anyhow, those are some of the "challenges" I've encountered -- to add to the "adventure." If there were no challenges, it wouldn't be an adventure. Am I right?
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Paul: Those are ok for you in a 582 which only has 16 amps. 912iS has 15 and 35 amps. Glade should be able to run a humongous amount more than you really. He just needs to get things right. You are right that your 13.4 volts on the Enigma are really 13.8 volts because with the errors its about 0.4 volts more than it shows
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Glade: Blisters ... wow. That is a no go. Which product is that? on your feet?

    2 to 3 hours in the Revo should not hurt your knee. That's a pretty average leg time. Are you using the cruise throttle (it sounds like you are) and even then your knee is getting pressure on it somehow?
  • Victor Carmichael
    by Victor Carmichael 4 years ago
    Blisters from trike flying, that's a first! Best thing for those is a clean needle and thread, pierce them through from one end to the other. Great to hear your stories on here. Safe home
  • Chuck Burgoon
    by Chuck Burgoon 4 years ago
    The joke when I was getting typed in an ERJ was that if you get a blister on your index finger you’re grounded.
  • Chuck Burgoon
    by Chuck Burgoon 4 years ago
    Money for nothing…chicks for free?
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 years ago
    Glade,
    Thanks so much for posting your adventure. Many are following. I am just catching up and finishing a couple of projects. Looks like you will be going north via California and not stopping buy Reno/Carson, I understand.

    Looks like a pretty good window tomarrow to fly north up the California valley. North winds aloft but here is a tip. I have flown from San Francisco to Reno many times and that pesky north wind slowed progress. Flying at 2000 AGL I had a 20 knot cross/headwind. Looking down I saw it calm on the ground so I descended and at 300 AGL it was calm and blasted 300 AGL past Sacramento until I had to start climbing.

    You would be surprised at the differences in wind velicity at different altitudes. I will be flying here in Reno tomarrow (thursday) and will be thinking of you northbound over the hill.

    Always, fly safe.

    Best,
    Paul Hamilton
  • Dave Sharafinski
    by Dave Sharafinski 4 years ago
    Chipless in the Canyon? Blisters on your feet? Leg begging for a couch? Yep, sounds like a trike trip to me! Takes a dedicated guy to fly BACK to the canyon for the video you promised us! No pictures or video ... without proof it's all hearsay! Blisters schmisters, it's not like you're WALKING cross-country! Hope you've got a big grin on your face. You deserve it. It's been very cool to read about your adventure. Someone remarked that the "adventure" doesn't begin until the "plan" falls apart. Seems fitting. Such an epic journey. Oh hey, my Rexhall RV was built in Lancaster. If you get REALLY bored I think they still offer tours. Swap your magic carpet for a gas-guzzler? Doubt you've reached that level of desert fever. Have a pleasant flight tomorrow. Looking forward to hearing the full debrief over some Mas Grande margaritas!
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Dave, you're hilarious as always. Vince, thanks for suggesting, but I think I'd just as soon skip any local media. Paul, thank you for the suggestion to fly low. It is most likely what I will do. Abid, are you saying there's a hand-throttle on the Revo? I can use that instead of my foot? Just kidding. Of course that's what I'm using, aside from at takeoff and landings. The problem is not the Revo; it's something weird in my knee. I do have very long legs, which means that at best my knees are bent at near a 95 degree angle. It's significantly better than in my old Buggy, where the constant bend angle is more like 80 degrees.

    The weather is looking good for flight tomorrow to KSIY, almost in Oregon. I'll try to be off with sun's rising. It is not looking good, for continuation further north, on Friday. I suspect I may be stuck again, this next time only a day's flight from home. It looks like it might end up being fly-able the next day, on Saturday.
  • Vince  Morson
    by Vince Morson 4 years ago
    OK- if not local media, maybe national would suit you better. I can see the ABC news headlines now: " Modern Day Lindbergh endures Blistered Feet and Arthritic knees to fly his Ultralight Coast to Coast." Of course, the media would say "ultralight" no matter how hard we tried to convice them otherwise.:) Looks like you're making some good headway today Glade- good for you. Roosters is on me when you get in.
  • Bill Magness
    by Bill Magness 4 years ago
    Glade,
    For the national media, you should have flown to Miami first. Then you could say you flew from corner of the country diagonally to the other.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    If it's national media on which you insist, Vince, alright, I surrender. Roosters sounds good (for the benefit of others here, it's one of our local restaurants).

    To Bill, I actually did consider the Miami angle, and I figured that on the other corner of this country I could fly to see my daughter in Bellingham, WA, where she's a student at Western Washington University, and it would really fulfill the extreme opposite corner. But, I gather from commentary of several others that they'd be hard-pressed to make the time in which to fulfill a mission even as I've done. I'm also subject to constraints, and must not too excessively extend this time from work and family and beloved spouse. I feel I'm rather pushing it, as it is.

    Regarding today's progress, I was indeed airborne almost with the sun's rising. I headed almost due west, to cross the Tehachapis (the "hill"), into the bottom of California's Central Valley. Again there were clouds flowing thorough passes on either side, and on this day over the top as well. Forecasts had given me expectation of finding clear sight through to ground on the opposite side. I began climbing, for the jump-over, immediately after takeoff (BTW, I feel I'm getting kind of experienced at tower work now).

    There was a SIGMET for mountain obscurations, and I was also worried about turbulence. For both reasons, I figured it made sense to go plenty high: well above the clouds, mountains and -- hopefully -- turbulence. If you check the tracking, I think you'll see I eventually reached about 13,000. The mountains below were only in the range of 7,000, but as I proceeded over the clouds I found they kept pushing me upward as I obeyed the requirement to maintain a 1000 foot clearance above them. Certainly, I could have turned around upon finding they were pushing me past the standard, Sport-Pilot limit of 10,000, but as an attorney by training I am in the habit of finding favorable interpretations in any law or rule. Without doubt, the permission to exceed 10,000, as needed to maintain at least 2,000 feet above obstacles, is typically thought of as referring to rock and dirt, as obstacles. However, the clouds were all-but equally an obstacle for me. Rightly or wrongly, I decided to treat them as "obstacles" under the rule [since then, in talking with an FAA guy, I've learned my interpretation would not likely be accepted].

    So [and if with thin legal justification], I'm pretty high, working across the cloud-covered range. Though I cannot see through the clouds to directly-view terrain immediately below, I have excellent ground reference to both sides (in particular, a crystal-clear view of the San Gabriels to the south and Sierras to the north). I also have excellent continuing ground reference behind me, and figure, in the unlikely event of a power outage, I can easily glide back to that clear (and predicted to remain clear) high-desert area.

    For a short while, I feel a little pessimistic about the fact I can't see any end in the cloud mass looking forward, but I think about the physical dynamic that causes condensation of moisture in an air mass when it's forced upward by terrain (resulting in reduced pressure, etc.). I figure it is likely this dynamic that results in the condensation/clouds I am flying over, and that once I get past where the air mass is forced upward, I am likely to indeed see clearer air.

    But, I am not getting there quick.

    Over the top of that mass of clouds (and mountains below), I am managing approximately 35 mph forward speed. This is against a TAS (true air speed) of about 110. Yes, it's a 75 mph headwind. It feels like I am hardly moving. I wonder if I'm going to reach a point where there is not sufficient fuel to continue forward. Regardless, I know it's a very easy path back to Lancaster, should fuel begin running low.

    As it happened, after what seemed like an interminable period of time, I finally began to see what appeared to be potential breaks, with sight to the targeted valley floor, far ahead. I was not certain that's what I was seeing, but I thought it was. I forced myself to remain patient as, at such a slow pace, I slowly gained these regions.

    By and by, I'd fully reached the valley. The clouds became broken, and instead of just having ground reference to each side and behind me, I had it in front of me as well. At this point I tucked down under the clouds. If you examine the InReach tracking, this is where I turned north.

    The rest of the day was reasonably uneventful. Mostly, I flew rather low. Another pilot, experienced with the area, had told me he sometimes drops down to 300 feet above the perfectly flat fields to minimize headwind speeds. I did a fair amount of that, and tried other altitudes too. I failed rather abysmally to meet my goal of reaching KSIY (you may notice from the InReach tracking that I ended up in Red Bluff, CA). The main reasons were continuing and strong headwinds, combined with the fact the warm-start-failure phenomenon on the 912iS has only gotten worse.

    It had never happened before in a simple re-fueling situation. It did today at both re-fueling points. I re-fueled at KMAE (Madera), and went to re-start. Crank, crank, but no firing. Nothing, but nothing, would make it start. Finally, after about an hour, it was willing, and off I went. It happened again after re-fueling at O08 (Colusa). At each such point I've worked via telephone with Larry's dad, Phil, who in turn has worked with the best Rotax reps he can corner. At Colusa we might have come up with something. Phil asked me if the two, integrated fuel pumps happen to turn off during the failed attempts (each has a light to indicate operation). I had not prior thought much about it, but the answer was, yes, indeed they do. This caused Phil to conclude that perhaps something, which the computer logic does not like, was causing it to shut off the pumps right when their delivery was needed. He suggested I try with just Pump 2 and ECU B turned on. I did, and it started. At this point it's not possible to know if simply enough time had passed, or if indeed that's a solution. I guess we'll find out tomorrow.

    BTW, in regard to the starting issue and battery voltages, I was not prior remembering the latter with great accuracy. Today I observed carefully. Of course, now I'm not remembering with great precision, but near as I can recollect we're talking between 13.2 and 13.7 volts while running. The radio has a readout that indicates between 2 and 3 tenths of a volt higher than the EMS. At rest, the battery reads 12.4 volts on one and typically 12.7 on other. Regardless, I feel rather certain the voltage discussion is academic. I'll provide two reasons: (1) it is my overwhelming subjective impression that cranking speeds are the same in every instance, successful and non-successful; and (2) if voltage was the issue, success would be increasingly less likely as more attempts progressed (with increasing depletion of battery strength); what we encounter is precisely the opposite.

    On headwinds: Can you believe, in the entire traverse across the country, I have yet to encounter anything but. There has not been even a second of tailwind. Not one. Not ever. Not any place. I think my ASIs have averaged something close 88 mph, and TASs 95. I believe my GSs have likely averaged 60. In other words, average headwind: 35 mph. It kind of stinks. I've gone though way more than enough air to already be home. Heck, I'd been though enough three days ago.
  • Jan Ferreira
    by Jan Ferreira 4 years ago
    Hey Glade, we can be so stupid some times, you know, if you would have flown east back from Florida you would have had a tail wind all the way. I know it is a bit further around the globe but then you wouldn't have had to deal with that pesky head wind. Good going Glade, I think you have set a record time for flying so far with an "Ultralight".
  • Arthur Thompson
    by Arthur Thompson 4 years ago
    Glade,
    First on battery charge: "At rest" means disconnected and if that was the case, 12.4 volts is nearly discharged; 12.2 volts is considered discharged. If the battery at 12.4 volts was still connected and there was some load on it then it is not possible to determine the charge level unless you know the resistance of the load.
    Second comment: Because of the rotation of the earth prevailing winds in good weather are typically northwesterly and southwestery in bad weather. Storm location and terrain will change the direction. The exception is the tropical trade winds that are generally easterly and caused by warm, rising air near the equator and cooling, falling air near the poles. Sailors will go to the tropics to travel west and the "roaring forties" (40 degrees latitide to sail east. Sorry mate, you were doomed to headwinds unless it was calm or the storm was positioned to give you easterlies.
  • Lee Schmitt
    by Lee Schmitt 4 years ago
    am i the only one getting a blank page when i click the delorme link?
  • Bill Magness
    by Bill Magness 4 years ago
    Mine shows him on the ground in red bluffbut time and date is Thur. at 6:00 pm.
  • Ken Bartlett
    by Ken Bartlett 4 years ago
    This web page is a cool site to see the prevailing winds across the US. http://hint.fm/wind/
    Lee - I just clicked it and it's working. Glade is at Red Bluff Municipal in CA.
  • Craig Valentine
    by Craig Valentine 4 years ago
    Glade - It has been fun following your flight along with the talk about winds aloft and ground speeds due to those winds. Larry Mednick and I had a discussion on this very subject this past summer where it was framed in terms of our Personal Best Ground Speed (PB). So he asked me what was the fastest GPS ground speed reading I had had in a trike in statute miles per hour? 168 MPH I replied. Then he asked what's the fastest speed you have with a confirming photograph, because he had a photo of his GPS showing 150 MPH in his Revo. I laughed and replied it had never occurred to me to take a photo. Larry's right of course...so get a photo of your high PB and post it here. It will be a lot of fun to share.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Hey Lee, sometimes you have to wait a bit for the web page to fill in. Try changing the zoom level too (zoom out). My mom has been managing the interface just fine. If she can do it, anyone can (sorry Mother; that wasn't nice of me, and I do love you). BTW, for any of you that had not noticed, you can click on any of the little bubbles to see what the altitude, course and speed were at the moment of that fix.

    Yes, I am momentarily weather-stuck in Red Bluff. This is a place I thought I might get stuck, for the Siskiyou mountains (just north of here) get a lot of bad weather. I nevertheless thought I'd make it over them this morning. Aside from some not necessarily apt METARS, all the other online indications seemed favorable (all stations along the way were reporting calm or near calm air, and full visibility). When I talked with the weather briefer, however, I was persuaded to refrain. I believe it would have been an easy and safe flight regardless (the applicable stations continued to report good VFR for hours thereafter, satellite photos looked good, and so on). But, I did not feel it would be prudent to proceed when the briefer said VFR flight was "not recommended."

    Even had I gone, I likely would have been stopped by weather just past the Siskiyous. There's a huge front over the northwest right now. The radar views have been really impressive.

    At present I'm set to stay a second night here in Red Bluff. It's a nice town. My mom and dad lived here for 25 years (after I'd left home). Several of my siblings lived here for a time as well (one of my brothers raised his family here), and I brought my family to live here for a single year while making the transtion form So. Cal to Washington state. In fact, my mom still owns 25 acres right down the street from where I'm staying.

    Present predictions are that the front will have moved largely past by tomorrow afternoon. Assuming I get a weather briefer's blessing, I believe I'll fly as far as Weed, in the afternoon tomorrow (if so, I'll tie down my Revo and pitch my tent for the night; I've been equipped with full-on camping gear all this time and have not used it yet). If not, I'll at least make a 30 mile hop to Redding (where I've ascertained I can get a hangar for the night), so I'll be that much further for an early launch on Sunday, which is looking like it will be my homecoming day. Yahoo! I'm really, really wanting to get home. I miss my wife and family, and I suspect employees and clients at my business are missing me.

    BTW, since I've confessed to some of my woes here, I'll confess another. I've come down with a really, very nasty cold. While flying, I keep having to lift my visor so I can cough without spraying the inside (yuck!). In Lancastger I picked up some decongestent (yes, I assured it is non-drowsy) to try and assure my eustacion tubes remain free to equalize as altitude changes, and that seems to have worked fine. I picked up some more and stronger medicines today, including expectorant and cough suppressant (again, assuring non-drowsy-inducing, and so on). To some extent I think the weather stoppage has been beneficial, as it's allowed me time to gain needed rest to better augment healing. Even so, the way colds typically progress, I don't expect to be well until sometime after getting home.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Dang, Craig, I should have briefly turned around when over the Tehachapi's and flying into 75 mph headwinds. I was managing a TAS of about 110. I could have, upon turning around, had a GS of 195. The problem is, in just a brief turnaround for such purpose, I would have, with super rapidity, forfeited the benefit of many minutes uphill labor.
  • Craig Valentine
    by Craig Valentine 4 years ago
    Yep, we all have a bunch of those "I should have just turned around or I wish I knew about PB's or I wish I had brought a camera". ..certainly all of those have applied to me at one time or another. So The Semi-Official TPS PB Record Holder is Larry Mednick at 150 SMPH and he will become The Official TPS PB Record Holder as soon as he posts the photo he showed me. I've got a feeling this record is not going to stand for very long.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I all goes well, tomorrow night I'll be sleeping in my own bed, with my own dear wife, Laura, by my side. The prospect sounds wonderful. I have about 450 miles remaining. It should not be tough to achieve, by the standards I've prior set. At least, absent engine problems, enormous headwinds, or other unforseens.

    Speaking of "enormous headwinds," I flew prox 100 miles this afternoon from Red Bluf to Weed, CA (O46). Weed is in a beautiful mountain valley located in about the middle of the Siskiyus, and is nestled right off the foot of mighty Mount Shasta. I might have planned to go further, but the remnants of named-storm Rocky were still working nasty conditions just north of here.

    In fact, I flew today against a weather briefer's statement of "VFR flight is not advised." I'm still very new to this weather-briefing stuff, and learning, but based on having wanted to do the same flight yesterday, on having received the same statement, and on having culled all the information I could throughout the day and finding all the independent evidence suggested I could have easily done a safe flight, I was beginning to wonder if a pilot could not be prudent, err on the side of caution, and yet simultaneously decide to fly in the presence of such a statement -- particularly where all the details provided by the briefer (along with all the details one can find independently) seem to suggest the flight can be taken with a high margin of safety.

    Last night, in conversation with Phil Mednick (a very experienced and competent pilot), my speculation was confirmed. So, with the benefit of that confirmation (and independently judging on the basis of all desctribed parameters that I could undertake the flight safely), I launched.

    There were rather significant mountains to get past, and scattered clouds at about 8,000. My first preference was to fly well above clouds and mountains (the biggest impetus in this regard was to avoid turbulence). Below the clouds I found myself flying against a headwind averaging about 45. Above the clouds, it was more like 75 (at one point I literally saw my groundspeed drop to 15, and this was with airspeed of about 90). I tried the high and smooth path a couple times, but each time the slow progress drove me back downward. Below the clouds, also, I could not fly the straight path I preferred. Mountains were too high. I had to steer around.

    It was also extremely cold. At one point it was just 25 degrees.

    Nonetheless, I made it. My only real fear, safety-wise, had been in regard to turbulence (it was apparent before leaving that visibility and icing would not be issues). What I encountered was precisely the "moderate" turbulence that had been predicted. More than I'd like, but well within the manageable range.

    Oh, I beat Larry's personal best. When encountering that 75 mph headwind, I briefly turned around. Long enough to show GS of 154. I pointed my helmet cam down to document it. Afterward I realized I'd forgotten to press the remote to record at that moment. But it's true. I swear it!

    There's something I thought I should mention about the Delorme tracking. When you look at my east-to-west track across the bottom of the country, it appears to bow significantly upward toward the center. Why would I chart this upward bow, and thereby lengthen my path. What you see, in that regard, is an illusion -- an artifact of the map-projection Delorme chose to use. If you think about it, you'll be able to recall often looking at maps of the US (or any other northern-latitude geography) where lines of latitude (and/or borders associated with them) show as downward-bowing curves (such as much of the US/Canada border, for example). This form of projection creates a nearer-to-truth approximation of how the land actually lays out (projections are what's involved in converting what's truly a curved surface onto a flat map). DeLorme is using what's called a Mercator projection, which always shows lines of latitude as straight lines. Mercator projections have the unfortunate side effect of making any east-to-west or west-to-east path, that's a significant distance from the equator (the effect is more pronounced the greater the distance is), artificially appear curved. It's a distortion of the projection method, and not of the path itself.
  • Herman Eldering
    by Herman Eldering 4 years ago
    Glade such a wonderful experience watching someone else do all the hard yards. Just returned from spending 3 days with Larry Mednich and his delightful sidekick Amy at Holbrook NSW in Australia where Larry graciously spent his valuable time fine-tuning our Revo wings to Australian conditions. What an incredible learning experience, he truly has a magic touch and my Sports wing is now even better, and light as a feather in roll and pitch. I've never had customer service of this quality before and true dedication to every single thing being perfect. Thank heavens my landing with Amy in the backseat filming was "bump-free" and not embarrassing its a bit stressfull thinking she's had the Larry landing experience! Larry and Amy and the Australian importer Jon Newell were wonderful company and we had a wonderful time with barbecued Rib-Eye steaks and washed down by Bundaberg Rum and Coke in fact it was so good they asked for a repeat the second night. Long live the fabulous Revo the very best trike in the world!
  • John Williams
    by John Williams 4 years ago
    CONGRATULATIONS, GLADE !!!
    Looks like Glade just landed at his home airport. What a trip. Great job, Glade !! You did it and you did it with style !
  • Robert Morrison
    by Robert Morrison 4 years ago
    Glade, congrats....enjoyed watching and reading all comments. You were booking at about 101 ground speed just before the town of Chehalis.....guess you were in a hurry to get home. Another SAFE flight for trikers on the X Country experience. Enjoy that new toy as well.
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 years ago
    Glade, I just got to an airport with wifi here in Australia and just logged on to TPS. All I can say is WOW. Not only did you make the trip, you had no ground crew, and you WERE a relatively low hour pilot with under 200 hours??? Before the trip anyway. What an amazing journey! Amazing head winds (and tail winds). CONGRATULATIONS!
  • Craig Valentine
    by Craig Valentine 4 years ago
    Congratulations Glade. Job well done!
  • Paul Hamilton
    by Paul Hamilton 4 years ago
    Glade,
    You are the new/young/almost virgin 150/ intrepid trike rock star. Welcome. I hope to see a book.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Thanks for the congrats, guys. I am indeed home. Wow!. What a triip. I'll post more later, but this evening I'm spending time with family.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Herman: Rum and Coke won't cut it. Try Long Island Iced Tea tomorrow for Amy and Larry. Keep a video camera handy.
  • Abid Farooqui
    by Abid Farooqui 4 years ago
    Congrats Glade. Glad you made the right choices at the right times. Fly safe.
  • Lee Schmitt
    by Lee Schmitt 4 years ago
    i'm thrilled for you Glade! congratulations on an epic trip.
  • Peter Del Vecho
    by Peter Del Vecho 4 years ago
    Congrats Glade. Very well done and inspiring. You already have surpassed the hours on my Revo! A great adventure.
  • Tony  Castillo
    by Tony Castillo 4 years ago
    Wonderful trip Glade. Congratulations!!!!!!
    Tony C
  • Wayne Parker
    by Wayne Parker 4 years ago
    Hey, Glade - I missed the chance to say hello during your trip, but checked in on the blog a couple of times, then saw last night that you'd gotten in yesterday. Awesome trip, especially this time of year (brrrrr!). Well done! Hope we meet up this summer somewhere here in western Washington. -- Wayne
  • Todd Ware
    by Todd Ware 4 years ago
    Sky Warrior arrives triumphant! LOVE good triking stories, with happy endings. Great job Glade. You have shown great interior metal (carbon fiber?) for taking this on.
    You probably earned a few extra gray hairs on the trip, but hey, you beat one of Larrys records. That is worth it.
    Some guys refer to getting their new trike into their hanger as "a new beginning". And so it is. Happy flying.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I sure appreciate all the kinds words, everybody. I promised to make a post describing the final day of flight. I've been so busy with catch-up, since getting home, it's taken me time to get to it.

    That final day (this past Sunday) was from Weed, CA to home. I was in my Revo, packed, belted and ready-to-go by about 6:30 am. I started the engine and it immediately revved to about 4300 rpm. That was odd. The hand throttle definitely was not out, nor was my foot on the foot throttle. I shut it off, and (on investigating) discovered the cable between foot throttle and engine was frozen. Worse than merely being frozen, it was frozen (frozen as in "stuck") at about the one/third depressed position.

    I was not immediately certain what could be the cause. I called and talked with Phil Mednick (Larry's dad, who has been positively terrific in holding my hand through all of these matters). He suggested I remove the seat assembly so as to be able to inspect the entire length of the cable (plus the splitter) from within the innards of the fuselage. There are a lot of allen-head screws involved in this removal, but I did it. All appeared in order (no kinks, packed items jamming movement, etc.). Based on this, both Phil and I concluded that somehow a bit of H2O must have made it into the cable, and it must have "frozen" solid in the 23 degree air.

    Phil wondered if I had anything (aside from hand-warmth) with which to warm the cable. I did not. I tried imparting hand-warmth here and there for a while, but to no avail. We decided the best way to warm the cable would be to put the seat assembly back in place, and let the engine run long enough to warm those interior spaces to the point of thawing the fault. That's what I did. After perhaps 7 or 8 minutes of running, my foot's pressure on the foot throttle finally produced movement. I then shut off the engine, and worked the cable back and forth until it was totally free.

    Why did it freeze in the throttle-significantly-on position. Well, I had acquired a couple of seat cushions to aid the comfort of long hours sitting. The standard Revo seat is extremely comfy, but even its thick cushioning begins to feel hard after many hours. Anyhow, to assure that these add-on seat cushions would not be blown away over night, I'd stuffed them into the footwell. Evidently, in that stuffed position they were partially depressing the foot throttle.

    So, now the frozen foot-throttle cable is fixed, I reinstall the seat assembly, re-pack all my stuff, and intend again to depart. But, alas, there is the warm-start problem I've been combating for days. Since I ran the engine long enough to get it good and warm, it now requires an hour further delay before I can get it to start again. With all these frustrations, I did not manage to take off from Weed until around 10:30 am. This did not bode real well, since I had so many miles to cover if I was going to make it to home before dark that night.

    Fortunately, I finally began having some favorable winds. At first they were just neutral, then they actually became tailwinds. I'd been planning on two fuel stops (part of why I figured I'd need the 6:30 am departure), but with the favorable speeds I was making I re-calculated and changed to one fuel-stop, significantly further along than I'd formerly planned. It ended being in Albany, OR. There I quickly fueled, hoping against hope I'd not encounter the warm-start problem. I did, and again had to wait an hour before the engine cooled enough to start again.

    Gladly, tailwinds soon became even better. Getting near home, I was doing approximately 100 mph ground speed, and at one point I saw myself at 104. The weather was good as well. Scattered clouds, and otherwise clear air.

    That is, until approximately the last 20 miles of home. At that point I began encountering rather nasty turbulence (rotors off the mountains that are just south of here), and visibility reduced to, perhaps, three or four miles. It is actually the worst visibility I've ever flown in, and certainly seemed the most hazardous condition I encountered on the entire trip. That's right. The portion of flight within 20 miles of home was the worst! Go figure.

    It was mighty great to finally come in. Art Thompson was there with his wife watching me come in (and taking video as well). I saw my wife and youngest son (last one still at home) pulled up in our SUV at the airport gate as I was taxiing (they'd intended to be advance-posted alongside the runway for my landing, with balloons deployed, welcome sign and champagne at the ready, but my high-speed at the end fooled them). Vince Morson arrived very shortly with his endearing brood. One of my employees and longtime friends, Josh Smith, also arrived, and it all felt warm and great.

    I will try to do another post, summarizing some of the stats. If any of you other guys are considering such an adventure, I do recommend it.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I promised a synopsis of the trip, and here it is.

    I spent, essentially, 7.5 days dedicated to flight. For some portions of some of those days, I was combating issues such as the warm-start problem. In point-to-point distance (i.e., as-the-crow-flies, from each takeoff point to each landing point), I covered 3147 miles over the ground.

    In truth, my over-the-ground distance was likely closer to 3400 miles, given that straight-line paths were not always applicable.

    Anyhow, based solely on the more definite figure, my average distance gained, per flight day, was some 420 ground miles. My best day was 544 ground miles.

    Total air time was 49.5 hours, meaning an average speed-made-good (i.e., calculating as straight, point-to-point ground distance) at just under 64 mph. Average air-time per flight-day was 6.6 hours. Since my average TAS was prox 92 mph, it's reasonable to conclude I pressed through more than 4500 miles of air mass.

    I flew 21 legs overall, with an average distance-per-leg of 149 miles (a few short hops brought this average down; if removing those, the average shows instead at 175 miles). The longest leg flown was 220 miles. Legs averaged just under 2.4 hours in duration. My longest-lasting leg was 3.6 hours (it was not the same as the leg with the highest miles).

    I did not directly track my fuel burn, but based on fuel burn rates I estimate having burned 124 gallons. At an average price of about $5.50 per gallon, that's a cost of about $680. MPG works out (against point-to-point, ground miles made good) at 25.4. If driving roughly the same route in a car, road miles would have been some 3556. An MPG comparison on this basis yields an airplane-to-car comparison of just under 29 mpg. Against road miles, my speed made good averages to about 72. Neither of these figures appear spectacular, but there were (of course) the headwinds.

    For comparison, my last leg to home would have involved 203 road miles, if going by car. I made it in just 2 hours, and burned about 5 gallons. That works out as a to-car-comparison speed of over 100 mph, and MPG over 40. I do love tailwinds.

    I spent 3.5 days waiting for better weather, making my trip net out (overall) at 11 days.

    My total hours as a pilot now stand at 224.2, with 819 landings.
  • B  Alvarius
    by B Alvarius 4 years ago
    Glade

    Congrulations on a successful journey, one for the scrapbook.
  • Fred Snyder
    by Fred Snyder 4 years ago
    Why to go Glade, I'm sure this is a trip you always remember! Thanks for posting your progress, I enjoyed reading your updates!
  • Lee Schmitt
    by Lee Schmitt 4 years ago
    Glade, do you agree with me that the Revo desperately needs a bigger fuel tank?
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Lee, if using a standard 912s, I think I might well agree. With the 912iS, I can easily cruise at 84 mph (max hands-off speed with my new Rival wing as currently trimmed) at 2.5 gph. That's four hours cruising time, while still allowing a full hour reserve. Do I want to sit in the cockpit, non-stop, for more than four hours?

    During my trip, I was often flying with constant pull-in on the bar to compensate for nasty headwinds, with a corresponding higher rpm and higher burn rate. Still, I do not think there was any case where I did not have at least three hours of (potential) burn time with full-hour reserve remaining.

    Either way, it's quite a long time to hold your bladder.

    If cruising with friends (whose trikes typically do about 55 mph), I will likely have the Revo's electric trim set to slowest (as opposed to fastest) position. I don't recall specifically noting what the fuel-burn rate is in this configuration, but I believe (when I have briefly flown in such configuration) I was seeing about 1.8 gph. At that rate, I could cruise for well over six hours, while still leaving a full hour in reserve. I'm not sure I need a tank that has the capacity to give me more time than that.

    I'm curious how your fuel-burn rates compare?
  • Larry  Mednick
    by Larry Mednick 4 years ago
    Hey guys, I am happy to say the new gas tank is almost finished and will be a SUN N FUN. Not only is it larger, but it offers a quick fill as well. The size is not yet determined but I'll have all that info at SUN N FUN.

    Best of all any of these impovements to the REVO (like our new high travel front forks) are all compatable and upgradable dating back to serial #1
  • Lee Schmitt
    by Lee Schmitt 4 years ago
    wow glade, i had no idea you got 2.5 burn rate! thats awesome. no i burn almost twice that. 4 to 4.5 when maxed out for cross country flight.
    Larry, that's good news. you didn't figure out a way to see the fuel level in flight did you??? regardless, you know i want one. i'm flying out to AZ in a few weeks to fly the Revo home.
  • Bill Larsen
    by Bill Larsen 4 years ago
    Glade, congratulations on a truely awsome journey. Life has slowed down some since you reached your destination. Have any more trips planned??? I miss the daily posts and looked forward to each installment. By the way, please post the outcome of your 'hot start' problem when you determine the cause. I'm sure there are a lot of us anxious to learn what was going on with your new Rotax.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    This is somewhat of a postscript.

    It was not a quick process, and (since my Revo is now diagonally clear across the country from its manufacturer) it definitely required a bit of cooperative effort on my part. Regardless, we finally found a solution on the 912iS warm-start problem that developed about mid-way through my big cross-country trip (you may read above for details).

    First, it turns out Rotax was purely innocent. The problem was outside their product.

    More specifically, it was in a spade connector on a relay within the outside wiring.

    The fuel-injection engine has two fuel pumps (redundancy in virtually everything). Until the engine is actually running, a different and separate circuit is required to keep those fuel pumps powered. And, it's not like in a carburated engine where a fuel pump might merely assist. For fuel injection, at least one fuel-pump running is essential. Anyhow, this separate circuit is engaged via a little relay. The symptom I had was that, when attempting to start warm, within fractions of a second of the cranking action beginning, both fuel pumps would shut off (there are separate lights for each fuel pump, which makes the shut-off rather obvious). With both fuel pumps off, further cranking was futile.

    It turns out it's this relay that's involved in keeping the fuel pumps powered pending engine start, and one of the wires connecting to this relay, via spade connector, was not tight. The female-end of the spade connector was just a little slack. The fix, once this was discovered, was as simple as pulling off the female end, squishing it a little tighter with pliers (so the parts that ultimately clamp on the spade are nearer together), then re-inserting the spade (don't think anything sexual here, please). I tested afterward, and all was perfect. I am happy.

    Evolution Aircraft contracts with Powrachute in Michigan for direct manufacture of the Revo. This company does superb work. With a tremendously complex aircraft, this is the one (and only), directly definable and operational defect I have encountered. It appears. when someone at Powrachute attached the seven spade connectors to this particular relay, that person failed to notice this particular female end was not really and truly tight when pushed upon its adjoining spade (again, no sex please).

    BTW, this was the first time Powrachute ever built a Revo with a 912iS, which encompasses monumentally more external wiring as compared to the standard 912s.

    Though the consequence was frustrating, I have to tell you I am really impressed that this is the "worst" problem I've encountered, from the very, very fine work done on my Revo.

    I salute Powrachute for their excellent work, for the pride they obviously take in their work, and I further and even more strongly salute Larry Mednick, his dad Phil, and the whole crew at Evolution Aircraft for the intense dedication they have to this sport. I could hardly be happier. They afforded me a great adventure, along with further and continuing sublime enjoyment in my incredible aircraft.
  • Jan Ferreira
    by Jan Ferreira 4 years ago
    Glade,
    Great report on a successfull trip. Now we are waiting for the video and pictures...:>)
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Thanks Jan. I pretty much did just video, and I've not had yet even to look at most of it.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    Update on the 912iS warm-start fault.

    Turns out it was not fixed after all. Not at all fixed. Further experience proved it's in a state between fully warm and fully cooled where the fault occurs. When I thought I had it fixed, I'd fully warmed for testing, but had not let it cool in a degree sufficient to trigger the fault. In nutshell, if you shut down long enough to re-fuel, change passengers, or take a bathroom break, you're not going to re-start absent waiting on the tarmac for at least an added hour. If you're shut-off for less than five minutes, by contrast, you'll likely re-start just fine.

    I have been through extreme agony on this, and am extremely upset with the North American Rotax distributor, Kodiak, for its complete lack of effective assistance.

    I finally solved the fault myself -- without the slightest assistance from Kodiak, and with very little that was effective from Evolution (though Larry's dad, Phil, was indeed very diligent in trying).

    I will describe the ultimate solution, either in a further post here, or in a new blog. If in a new blog, my description will be a rant. I am still hoping for effective help -- on another problem, to which it appears zero attention has been paid. If none is soon forthcoming on that, there will indeed be a new blog, fully describing my agony, and disgust.
  • Glade Montgomery
    by Glade Montgomery 4 years ago
    I posted the update blog. Here's a link: http://www.trikepilot.com/members/profile/3231/blog-view/874
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