May 31st

How do you SLSA certify a brand new trike

By Rizwan Bukhari

Hi all,

 

If you buy a brand new trike, then what is the procedure to SLSA certify it? One of my buddies wanted to buy a brand new Aeros 912 trike and asked me if it could be SLSA certified.

Does anyone know what is the process of certification for any foreign made brand new trikes (Aeros, AirCreation, Airborne etc) that is ordered and shipped brand new from a foreign country.

 

Regards,

 

Rizzy

May 7th

How to find Trike Pilots and Instructors near you and/or finding a place to get trained, transitioned or updated.

By Paul Hamilton

 

This has been an incredible start to the flying season. I have never gotten so many calls asking “where can I find a trike instructor near me?”

 

Good news and bad news. The good news is that most of the qualified trike instructors and many pilots are listed at:

 

http://lsapilot.sportaviationcenter.com/sport-pilot-locator/

 

This is the most comprehensive, up to date site to find pilots and instructors. This is where I send everybody. Pilots and instructors, please look at this and let me know if it is up to date for your area. I personally maintain this and try to be as accurate and comprehensive as I can.

 

The bad news is that there may not be a qualified trike instructor close to you. Many times it is better to travel and concentrate on flying with a full time established school and get it done. Your program is listed at http://sportpilottraining.sportaviationcenter.com/sport-pilot-applicant/sport-pilot-applicant-start/ We have two and sometimes THREE FULL TIME trike instructors ready to train you. I can give you your checkride. One stop shop.

 

Other trike instructors please feel free to list your web site here and MAKE SURE YOU ARE ON THE TRIKE LOCATOR http://lsapilot.sportaviationcenter.com/sport-pilot-locator/

 

Best,

 

Paul Hamilton, CFI, DPE LSRM-trike

 

Apr 28th

Rotax 912 float warning. Check yours. It can happen to you. It has happened to me.

By Paul Hamilton

 

Recently, I have had numerous problems with the Rotax Carb Floats. Luckily I was able to avoid an engine failure, just loss of power but enough to land safely. This has been for new and old floats. They absorb fuel and can sink.

 

Some say that the newer floats are OK, Wrong. Some say that the older floats are OK, Wrong. I have seen sinking floats in all ages.

 

It is really simple, run the engine or the electric fuel pump and fill the carb bowls. Pull the bowls and see if the fuel level is equal below the top of the bowl. See if the floats all look like they are floating at the same level and lastly take the floats out, let them dry and weigh them. If a float is more than 3.1 grams it is no good. Rotax sez 7 grams for both, but in my opinion, this does not  leave much room for error.

 

This is a simple safety check for all 912 carb owners

 

Check your floats.

 

Apr 24th

New Wings for Airborne Trikes

By Rizwan Bukhari

 

It seems like Airborne has three new wings for their new trike. I wonder if these wings would be available for their existing trikes.

 

XR -S     Toples

XR -K     Kingpost Double Surface Wing

XR -M     Kingpost Single Surface Wing

 

Here is the link, check them out

 

http://www.airborne.com.au/images_new_site/microlights/m3_sport/M3-Sport-A5-Fold.pdf

 

 

 

Apr 16th

Aerotrike Cobra Trike with Skis for Sale

By Rizwan Bukhari

Please contact Tom Shanahan with any questions. Complete and ready to go. Includes two helmets, headsets, Icom radio. Full instructor package with foot, cruise and back seat throttle, foot (nose wheel) pedals for the backseat, training bars. Skis are offered with the sale. Asking price with skis is only $17,000 and without the skis is $16,000 All reasonable offers will be entertained. Please contact me (Tom) at 208-420-2839 or email me at bugsshanahan@yahoo.com for any questions. Thank you.

 

Apr 11th

Initial Flight Review Airborne new M3-Sport trike with XRS wing

By Paul Hamilton

 

Just had my first test flight on the new Airborne M3-Sport trike with XRS wing. It was everything I expected. Note this has just myself (140 pounds) and one flight so these are my first impressions.

 

Nice improvements. What stuck out most has how straight it tracked. We would expect this with the huge wheel stabilizer area plus the winglets providing significant vertical stabilizer/rudder. Because of this, there is very little adverse yaw in the turns. No uncomfortable/odd slipping hard/scary to get out of turns. This lack of adverse yaw appeared to slow down the turn response slightly but the turn pressure is similar to the other high performance Airborne wings and maybe better.

 

With the minimum twist wing design, it performs surprisingly well with the 80 HP 912. Quite the glide for landing round out.

 

Again with just me, I could push the bar all the way to the front strut and it would not stall. When I brought it up quickly into a mild whip stall, the whole wing broke lift and pitched down quickly. Yahoooooo. When it stalls it stalls. No roll to either side and a clean straight break. We would expect this for a low twist high performance wing.

 

The trim system is about as effective as the other Airborne wings. Not a huge speed difference but I did not crank it to tight until I review this system better. From the factory trim was full throttle 75 MPH and glide at 65 MPH. Slightly faster than I like but I need to fly double with extra weight before I move the trim position on the keel.

 

What I really liked and thought was a big improvement was the offset engine angles providing minimum torque AND P factor effect throughout the engine and speed ranges. That high speed/full throttle irritating right turn of the older models drove me crazy. The combination of the engine offset with the vertical stabilizer area solves this problem.

 

Overall I think it is a winner and a great improvement. Make no mistake, this XRS is a high performance wing. You can get a lower performance wing on the updated/upgraded M3-Sport undercarriage and these should be options also.

 

This is a great option for the top of the line mid range priced trikes.

 

I will have this here for a while for demos as I train Warren the owner. Call me 775:772-8232 or e mail paul@SportAviationCenter.com  if you want more details for pricing and availability. 

 

Apr 9th

Travis achieves his goal to change his career/life and become and work as a trike CFI.

By Paul Hamilton

 

The phone rings. Someone asks if I provide mountain flying for trikes. HMMMMMMM…. Yes I do come out and fly with me and I will teach you how to fly in the mountains. Travis lived in NJ and wanted to get his CFI and set up operations in South America Chile to run a flight operation just like many other dreamers wanting a new life. I said “yea come out and fly with me and let me know when you are coming”. He said OK I will let you know.

 

It should be noted I get all kinds of calls about people wanting to live their dream but most are just talk. They say they will get back to me and that is the last I hear from them. Well this is not the story here.

 

About a month later Travis calls me and said “I sold everything and headed out to you. Do you still have that S-LSA trike for sale I want it?”.

 

Well he showed up, bought the trike, got his sport pilot license last summer and flew every possible time to get his 150 hours in less than a year. He just passed his CFI checkride and we had our first fly together with customers today. YaHoooooo

 

Travis will be working with me this summer providing intro flights at Lake Tahoe and doing primary training for trike students.

 

Congratulations Travis for living your dream and welcome to serious triking.

 

Apr 8th

Engine Failure After Takeoff

By Paul Hamilton

Engine Failure After Takeoff
As discussed earlier in Chapter 7, Takeoff and Departure
Climbs, proper takeoff technique provides lower pitch
angles during the initial climb to provide the slowest possible
descent rate for an engine failure after takeoff. The pitch
angle and altitude available for engine failure at takeoff are
the controlling factors in the successful accomplishment of an
emergency landing. If an actual engine failure should occur
immediately after takeoff and before a safe maneuvering
altitude is attained, it is usually inadvisable to attempt to turn
back to the takeoff fi eld. Instead, it is safer to establish the
proper glide attitude immediately, and select a fi eld directly
ahead or slightly to either side of the takeoff path.

The decision to continue straight ahead is often diffi cult to
make unless the problems involved in attempting to turn back
are seriously considered. First, the takeoff was probably made
into the wind. To return to the takeoff fi eld, a downwind turn
must be made. This increases the groundspeed and rushes
the pilot even more in the performance of procedures and
in planning the landing approach. Second, the aircraft loses
considerable altitude during the turn and might still be in a
bank when the ground is contacted, resulting in cartwheeling
(a catastrophe for the occupants, as well as the aircraft). After
turning downwind, the apparent increase in groundspeed
could mislead the pilot into a premature attempt to slow
the aircraft to a stall. Finally, it is more than one 180° turn.
For example, it is fi rst a 225° turn in one direction, then
another 45° turn in the other direction, totaling 310° of turn.
[Figure 13-6]

On the other hand, continuing straight ahead or making a
slight turn allows the pilot more time to establish a safe
landing attitude. The landing can be made as slowly as
desired, but more importantly, the aircraft can be landed
while under control.


At airports where the runways are much longer than needed,
there is typically ample runway to make a straight ahead
landing. If a tight pattern is being used and the crosswind leg
is started at the end of the runway, turning back the additional
90° to the runway could be the best option, depending on the
suitability of landing areas straight ahead.

Depending on the specific design of the WSC aircraft
considering weight, wing, and carriage, this maneuver can

be performed with no reaction time and as low as 250 to
500 feet AGL. However, the pilot should determine the
minimum altitude that such a maneuver would require of a
particular aircraft. Experimentation at a much higher, safe
altitude, 700 feet AGL as an example, should give the pilot
an approximation of height lost in a descending 225° and
45° turn at idle power. Starting high above the ground at
low bank angles and monitoring the altitude loss while doing
the required turns to line back up on the runway provides a
good reference. Finding the best bank angle to perform the
required turns for this maneuver with minimum altitude loss
is key to optimizing this maneuver and developing a habit if
this maneuver is needed in a real emergency.

By adding a safety factor of about 30 percent to account for
reaction time and no thrust from the propeller, the pilot should
arrive at a practical decision height. The ability to make these
turns does not necessarily mean that the departure runway can
be reached in a power-off glide; this depends on the wind,
the distance traveled during the climb, the height reached,
and the glide distance of the aircraft without power.

This is a highly advanced maneuver with turns close to
the ground. This should be practiced well into the training
program with the instructor. For example, consider an aircraft
which has taken off and climbed to an altitude of 350 feet
AGL when the engine fails. After a typical 4-second reaction
time, the pilot pulls down the nose, maintains control of the
aircraft, and elects to turn back to the runway, losing 50 feet.
[Figure 13-6, A to B] The pilot performs the 225° turn and
loses 300 feet. [Figure 13-6, B to C] The pilot must glide back
to the runway, losing another 50 feet. [Figure 13-6, C to D]
The pilot must turn another 45° to head the aircraft toward
the runway, losing another 50 feet. [Figure 13-6, D to E] By
this time the total change in direction is 310°, the aircraft
will have descended 450 feet, placing it 100 feet below the
runway.

 

Mar 30th

Death Valley takes my Wing

By Peter Owens

I'm in the need of a new wing for my Tanarg.

Left Oregon in my Toyhauler with my trike on a trip down to Death Valley last week for some nice warm flying as I done before in the spring. We camp at Stovepipe Wells .It has an airstrip next to it. It is always amazing to drive down the East side of the Cascades and Sierras through snow and ice all the way and to literally go from freezing to 80 degrees in the last hour of driving. This year it was hitting 90 when we got there.  I noticed a lot of Lennies in the sky so knew there were high winds aloft.

But the mornings were warm and calm and could fly around the valley in shorts and flipflops so all was great. The winds though would start to pick up from the south by 11. One morning my wife Theresa and I were flying to Furnace Creek to get some groceries but the wind was already starting to kick in from the south so we hightailed back to Stove Pipe and tied down the trike.

We drove to Furnace Creek and were having lunch at their golf course (It just seems wrong to have a golf course in Death Valley). But at least you can sit outside and eat. And the winds just kept picking up. It was starting to hit 30+ on the ground and I was just getting nervous about my Trike. Headed directly back to the airstrip and all was well. Still blowing like stink from the south, just tightened everything and headed back to camp. All good.

Back at Camp shortly thereafter the wind calms. First time in the afternoon it had done that. A friend stops by and we talk about taking him for a flight later.

We are sitting outside having a beer AND That is when the SCIROCCO hits!!!

A dust storm comes off the playa to the North and just rips through camp. Canopies are snapping off campers. Tents are blowing away. It’s now howling 40 FROM THE NORTH!!!. We race out to the airstrip (can’t even see the road for the dust storm) and get out there to see my trike flipped over. Ones wings webbing used for tying down was snapped. Yikes. One still intact. Stood out there for 1/2 hour caked in dust trying to keep it from scooting down the runway.

Soooo...  one Trike's wheel Pant broken, some fiberglass rash. But otherwise intact. (still have to go through it.) The wing though is toast. Keel broken. Sail shredded.

Lesson learned. When it the desert, whatever it takes, tie the tail down to something. I could have used a long tie to a parallel cable that was there for tie down.

 

So- now I'm in the market for a wing, new or used, for my Tanarg. Please contact me if you have something to sell.

Mar 30th

FOR SALE - BIONIX 13 WING

By Todd Halver

Check out my ad on Barnstormers:

Bionix 13 

http://www.barnstormers.com/listing.php?mode=usersearch&user=thalver