Jul 27th

How to get all trike pilots trained with spiral recovery

By Paul Hamilton

 

Now that we know the new training/testing standards the question is how to successfully implement it? It is important for everyone to get the proper safety training.

 

There are some CFI, and/or DPE’s who teach and others that do not teach spiral recovery.

 

The DPE’s can teach the instructors and the CFI’s can teach all their pilot base with flight reviews. Pilots simply ask for it.

 

I will provide training (and other CFI’s can do the same) to any DPE if they do not teach it or want some brushup. It is really simple and easy and it can be properly done in less than an hour (unless you are prone to motion sickness)Anything to get this out to all CFI.

 

This will take a little while, 3 years maybe to teach CFI's and get all the trike pilot with their 24 month Flight review.

 

Please provide names so we have a reference.

 

So lets get a list of the CFI’s who teach it and the CFI’s who do not can get the proper training.

 

Please provide CFI and Contact names so we have a reference. This can be from students who received the training of CFI’s who already do it. Also noice to know pilots who are comfortable

 

 

 

Qualified CFI Spiral Training CFI’s

 

Paul Hamilton (CA and NV)

Larry Mednick (FL)

Abid (FL)

Henry Boger (So CA)

Henry Trike Life (So CA)

 

 

Pilots who comfortably do spirals

 

Jul 26th

What are your wind limitations. Where should they be for different levels of pilots?

By Paul Hamilton

Establishing appropiate wind limitations is an important aspect of ADM/risk analysis.

On the runway, at altitude, in mountains/canyons are the stuations.

 

Where do you draw the line?

These are the four BUMP LEVELS for which I make the GO/NO GO decision to fly:

Nice Air

Moderate bumps

Uncomfortable air

Dangerious

 

What are your bump levels on the runway, at altitude, in mountains/canyons.

 

 

 

 

Jul 26th

New Training and Checkride Spiral Dive Recovery Standards

By Paul Hamilton

Well we finally did it. A great step for triking safety in the future. Thanks to all the discussion and input from Trike Pilots on this important issue. Bacground see: http://www.trikepilot.com/forum/topic/1233

 

 

Just out from the FAA to Designated Pilot Examiners:

 

 

There has been an addition of RECOVERY FROM A SPIRAL DIVE as an Emergency Task in both the Sport Pilot and Private Pilot WSC Practical Test Standards as well as the Weight Shift Control Flying Handbook.  Effective immediately this task must be tested in all practical tests for WSC.

 

 

 

The changes have been made and are now posted on the 630 web page.

 

 

 

Link: http://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/test_standards/.  Look for the dates of July, 2017, for the PTS changes.

 

 

 

Link:  http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aviation/.  Look for the change date of July, 2017.

 

 

 

Jul 23rd

is it time?

By monty stone

is it time to banish complacency ? not in any way blaming this as a cause for rebs accident, a possibility only. in my own february 'incident' the big 'C' played a big part in my costly , and painfull rollover, i wasn't really concentrating on what was happening around me. after all, i was only repeating what, and where i had taken off umpteen times before! i was COMPLACENT. and paid the price! as in all of lifes 'negative' experiences it would be nice to delete and re-do the causes, as yet, we don't have that 'app'.  so, how and what can we do to continue and enhance our 'floppy wing flying things' addiction? over the years we've discussed 'safety', and for a while we tend to tighten up our act a bit, more thorough pre-flight, etc, etc. but i know in my own case i get a bit 'complacent' and don't pay as much attention to the 'details' as i should. when a tragedy like rebs accident happens it's a wake-up call for ALL of us. if it can happen to a pilot like reb, it can easily get us 'lesser' pilots. so what can WE do to enhance our being able to still be flying these 'contraptions' in our 90s, (not too far ahead for some of us!). so, as has many times before been suggested  don't fly where you can't land, if the big fan behind you quits! don't fly up the center of  box canyons, close to mountains or over water , deeper than a wading pool! or over a wild animal park at feeding time, or over hunters during 'opening day' (lest we are mistaken for geese!) . or over a jealous husbands house, (i'm not explaining that one!). don't rely on a puny 'lap belt', only,  shoulder belts do help!  i've missed many other obvious 'donts', no doubt you smarter homonids have  your own safety 'credos' ranging from your favourite prayer printed on a grain of rice, duct-taped to your visor , to the 'lucky' rabbits paw hung on your ignition key ring. (it wasn't too lucky for the rabbit, but maybe it'll work for you!) i would also like to see, somewhere a wing grading system/chart listing from one to ten a particular wings ease or difficulty of control and training requred to fly it with a degree of competency, this would be a fairly straightforward task for the gurus , they have the the experience of flying various different wings and us 'mere mortal' trike drivers could then become over-night wing eggspurts!   lastly, how do we, trikers stack up, accident wise, fatal and non with other non comercial 'air-beaters', general av, rotary wings, gliders, balloons etc?  are we in trouble?  if so, what can we do about it?                                                                                                                                                                                                                      frazier nutsoff

Jul 10th

Thought of the Day: please add...

By Doug Boyle

Fly high not to die,

Fly Low you better know!

Jul 8th

More on turns....

By Bryan Tuffnell

ABOUT a hundred and seventeen years ago, an obstreperous bicycle mechanic with the very United Brethren name of Wilbur was busy concerning himself aircraft control. He figured that to turn an aircraft, yaw - which at the time most people thought held the key to turns - wasn't enough; a turn had to consist of the appropriate amount of roll, pitch and yaw. The Wright's lingering contribution to aviation is the concept that a turn is not a bend in an otherwise straight line but a three dimensional carved curve, and is why to this day we have control surfaces that operate in pitch, roll, and - usually, and it's important for us to understand that as trikers we have a degree of control of this - yaw.

A hundred and seventeen years later, it seems many of us trikers have forgotten Wilbur Wright's epiphany. We insult our wings in turns by rolling at trim speed and keeping it there, counting on the wing's inherent roll-yaw coupling to convert roll into some semblence of a turn. It works - kind of - and around we go, trike wings being generally forgiving of our lack of technique. Any lack of skill tends to go unpunished until a bit of load comes on... which it does when banked and turning... and this gets exacerbated by billow shift... which means that any absence of skill is most likely felt when trying to roll the wings level. In other words, you're more likely to have trouble rolling out of a turn than rolling into a turn, which is a bad time to discover you don't know something.

If you are flying straight and level and add bank, you have commanded the wing to fly straight with bank on - nothing more. The fact that the wing cannot do that is not incidental; the wing will fall off into an uncoordinated turn. But - here's the rub - while as trike pilots we have little direct control of yaw, we absolutely do have a measure of indirect control. To convert a slipping, banked flight into a coordinated turn we must add pitch. So, some rules:

  • ROLL gives BANK and SLIP
  • BANK and SLIP both cause a bit of YAW.

Okay, if that's as far as you go, you'll get a 'turn' of sorts. But it's like shifting your weight on a bicycle while steering straight ahead: your wing is out of balance.

  • ROLL and PITCH UP (pushing out) gives a BALANCED (COORDINATED) TURN.

Now, let's add finesse at the start of the turn: 

  • PITCH DOWN (pulling in) aids ROLL

There's sound aerodynamic reasons for this. You sometimes hear that pulling in a touch increases airflow over the wings and makes billow shift more effective, but that's not all. Who can give the correct reason?

And how do we translate this into real flying? We should have our hands fixed on the bar, a fair bit more than shoulder width apart (if your hands move, I recommend a couple of wraps of electrical tape on the bar to mark where they should stay. I also vastly prefer gloves to bar mitts, which encourage you to grab the bar the way a wino holds a bottle of Chardonnay - I like to have my thumbs either on top of the bar or pointing to each other along the back of the bar, never wrapped below the bar). Try this for an experiment:

  • Take your right hand off the bar altogether. Sit on it.
  • Roll to the left with your left hand.
  • Watch what happens.

You probably pulled the bar back a little as you rolled. No? Then try doing so. By pulling into the turn with just your inside arm, it's easy to simultaneously pull the bar back. Great! Now... when you're getting close to the desired bank angle,

  • PUSH FORWARD with the heel of both hands (not the crook between your thumbs and forefinger) until
  • the BANK ANGLE stays CONSTANT
  • AIRSPEED stays CONSTANT

If you've done this correcdtly, you'll whizz around and around in cirlces with no change in airspeed or bank. You'll lose altitude - unless you ADD THROTTLE - the final factor.

Rolling level should be the reverse:

  • REDUCE POWER while
  • PULLING IN and ROLLING LEVEL

I used to preach that any time you lost control in roll, reducing power and pulling in would always allow you to roll level. I don't say that now, because there are now trike wings that require you to have a basic grasp of turns, and such wings are not necessarily bad, they just won't take an insult: if you're slipping badly, you must correct for that before you're back in control (more on that later). This is may sound challenging, but is uttely fundamental to every form of flying, and every 3 axis pilot knows and comes to grips with this.

We're not riding bicycles here, we're pilots; we kid ourselves if we think that all we need to do to turn is to roll. If we do that, we're relinquishing our control from us as pilots and relying on factors such as sweep, dihedral, airfoil section, washout, midspan twist and a whole host of factors - down to the angle of struts and the size of our windscreens - to provide the control that we do not. You know how some wings have winglets? They exist because the designer couldn't achieve the roll-yaw coupling she wanted without compromising other aspects of her design. 

I want to stress that pilots are dying because they don't have a basic grasp of this. Henry and Ken's video is a great lesson: they are alive in all likelihood because Henry knew that pulling in (and reducing power) makes roll more effective, and under the loads they were experiencing was absolutely necessary. Several Arrow pilots have discovered that you cannot overcome billow shift in turns on that wing by rolling with weight shift, and pitching up to remove billow shift is needed before you can roll out of a slipped turn; knowing that has saved lives (my own included). 

I apologise to the majority of you who know all this... but I believe this stuff, and not pilot age or refresher training or lack of maintenance, is the biggest single cause of pilots losing control of their trikes. 

So, for a pop quizz:

  • What happens to billow shift in an unbalanced turn? In a coordinated turn?
  • Where is your weight in a coordinated turn?
  • Why does pulling in increase roll rate?
Jul 2nd

Reb Wallace died in a trike crash

By Rizwan Bukhari

It is with a very heavy heart that I write this. Our beloved Trike Instructor Reb died in a trike crash. There is not much information on it since it happened yesterday. He was with a student at the time of the crash.

I had the pleasure of flying with him many times and was inspired by his knowledge. He will be dearly missed. My condolences are with his family. When I was in Nevada, I flew with him at Lake Meade and the Hoover dam. I went to his house, where he burnt DVDs for me of that flight. I had the pleasure of meeting his wife and also their dog.

I am creating this blog with a very sad heart. And as we find more information about the accident, we will add it to the blog to learn more about what exactly happened.

 

http://www.ncwlife.com/wreckage-aircraft-chelan-airport-found-officials-attempting-reach/