Jul 2nd

Reb Wallace died in a trike crash

By Rizwan Bukhari

It is with a very heavy heart that I write this. Our beloved Trike Instructor Reb died in a trike crash. There is not much information on it since it happened yesterday. He was with a student at the time of the crash.

I had the pleasure of flying with him many times and was inspired by his knowledge. He will be dearly missed. My condolences are with his family. When I was in Nevada, I flew with him at Lake Meade and the Hoover dam. I went to his house, where he burnt DVDs for me of that flight. I had the pleasure of meeting his wife and also their dog.

I am creating this blog with a very sad heart. And as we find more information about the accident, we will add it to the blog to learn more about what exactly happened.

 

http://www.ncwlife.com/wreckage-aircraft-chelan-airport-found-officials-attempting-reach/

 

 

Jun 26th

Safety concerns when flying trike with a child passenger

By Rizwan Bukhari

 

Hi all,

 

I am considering flying my 10 years old son on my trike. I fly an Airborne XT which has a nice shoulder and lap strap belt system.

 

Call it a paranoia but my biggest worry is the passenger belt umbuckling during flight. And I am looking for some ideas for redundant seat belt safety for my son before I take him up for a flight.

 

Any input will be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Rizzy

 

 

Jun 25th

Trim Actuator

By Bill Chance

Need to hook up a llinear actuator for wing trim.  It's from Revo made by Duff Norton.  Can't find a wiring diagram from Duff Norton.  It has five wires coming out of it.  Three of the wires are hooked to an internal potentiometer and two wires go to the motor.  This unit was never installed and has been packed away for a number of years. The simple wiring diagram from Revo just shows two wires running to the actuator from a double throw double pole switch. Don't know if there should be more info. Running power to the motor wires runs the shaft in and out and my question is the potentiometer just used for motor position control purposes and it's not needed in this application.  Those of you that have the wing trim actuators are there just two wires running to it?  

 

I think Larry is out of pocket right now.   

May 31st

How do you SLSA certify a brand new trike

By Rizwan Bukhari

Hi all,

 

If you buy a brand new trike, then what is the procedure to SLSA certify it? One of my buddies wanted to buy a brand new Aeros 912 trike and asked me if it could be SLSA certified.

Does anyone know what is the process of certification for any foreign made brand new trikes (Aeros, AirCreation, Airborne etc) that is ordered and shipped brand new from a foreign country.

 

Regards,

 

Rizzy

Apr 24th

New Wings for Airborne Trikes

By Rizwan Bukhari

 

It seems like Airborne has three new wings for their new trike. I wonder if these wings would be available for their existing trikes.

 

XR -S     Toples

XR -K     Kingpost Double Surface Wing

XR -M     Kingpost Single Surface Wing

 

Here is the link, check them out

 

http://www.airborne.com.au/images_new_site/microlights/m3_sport/M3-Sport-A5-Fold.pdf

 

 

 

Apr 16th

Aerotrike Cobra Trike with Skis for Sale

By Rizwan Bukhari

Please contact Tom Shanahan with any questions. Complete and ready to go. Includes two helmets, headsets, Icom radio. Full instructor package with foot, cruise and back seat throttle, foot (nose wheel) pedals for the backseat, training bars. Skis are offered with the sale. Asking price with skis is only $17,000 and without the skis is $16,000 All reasonable offers will be entertained. Please contact me (Tom) at 208-420-2839 or email me at bugsshanahan@yahoo.com for any questions. Thank you.

 

Apr 8th

Engine Failure After Takeoff

By Paul Hamilton

Engine Failure After Takeoff
As discussed earlier in Chapter 7, Takeoff and Departure
Climbs, proper takeoff technique provides lower pitch
angles during the initial climb to provide the slowest possible
descent rate for an engine failure after takeoff. The pitch
angle and altitude available for engine failure at takeoff are
the controlling factors in the successful accomplishment of an
emergency landing. If an actual engine failure should occur
immediately after takeoff and before a safe maneuvering
altitude is attained, it is usually inadvisable to attempt to turn
back to the takeoff fi eld. Instead, it is safer to establish the
proper glide attitude immediately, and select a fi eld directly
ahead or slightly to either side of the takeoff path.

The decision to continue straight ahead is often diffi cult to
make unless the problems involved in attempting to turn back
are seriously considered. First, the takeoff was probably made
into the wind. To return to the takeoff fi eld, a downwind turn
must be made. This increases the groundspeed and rushes
the pilot even more in the performance of procedures and
in planning the landing approach. Second, the aircraft loses
considerable altitude during the turn and might still be in a
bank when the ground is contacted, resulting in cartwheeling
(a catastrophe for the occupants, as well as the aircraft). After
turning downwind, the apparent increase in groundspeed
could mislead the pilot into a premature attempt to slow
the aircraft to a stall. Finally, it is more than one 180° turn.
For example, it is fi rst a 225° turn in one direction, then
another 45° turn in the other direction, totaling 310° of turn.
[Figure 13-6]

On the other hand, continuing straight ahead or making a
slight turn allows the pilot more time to establish a safe
landing attitude. The landing can be made as slowly as
desired, but more importantly, the aircraft can be landed
while under control.


At airports where the runways are much longer than needed,
there is typically ample runway to make a straight ahead
landing. If a tight pattern is being used and the crosswind leg
is started at the end of the runway, turning back the additional
90° to the runway could be the best option, depending on the
suitability of landing areas straight ahead.

Depending on the specific design of the WSC aircraft
considering weight, wing, and carriage, this maneuver can

be performed with no reaction time and as low as 250 to
500 feet AGL. However, the pilot should determine the
minimum altitude that such a maneuver would require of a
particular aircraft. Experimentation at a much higher, safe
altitude, 700 feet AGL as an example, should give the pilot
an approximation of height lost in a descending 225° and
45° turn at idle power. Starting high above the ground at
low bank angles and monitoring the altitude loss while doing
the required turns to line back up on the runway provides a
good reference. Finding the best bank angle to perform the
required turns for this maneuver with minimum altitude loss
is key to optimizing this maneuver and developing a habit if
this maneuver is needed in a real emergency.

By adding a safety factor of about 30 percent to account for
reaction time and no thrust from the propeller, the pilot should
arrive at a practical decision height. The ability to make these
turns does not necessarily mean that the departure runway can
be reached in a power-off glide; this depends on the wind,
the distance traveled during the climb, the height reached,
and the glide distance of the aircraft without power.

This is a highly advanced maneuver with turns close to
the ground. This should be practiced well into the training
program with the instructor. For example, consider an aircraft
which has taken off and climbed to an altitude of 350 feet
AGL when the engine fails. After a typical 4-second reaction
time, the pilot pulls down the nose, maintains control of the
aircraft, and elects to turn back to the runway, losing 50 feet.
[Figure 13-6, A to B] The pilot performs the 225° turn and
loses 300 feet. [Figure 13-6, B to C] The pilot must glide back
to the runway, losing another 50 feet. [Figure 13-6, C to D]
The pilot must turn another 45° to head the aircraft toward
the runway, losing another 50 feet. [Figure 13-6, D to E] By
this time the total change in direction is 310°, the aircraft
will have descended 450 feet, placing it 100 feet below the
runway.

 

Mar 6th

What is the correct tension on a batten clip

By Rizwan Bukhari

 

Hi all,

 

I have a question about batten clip tension. In the past the wing I owned had a bungee or string cords (tensioners).

 

But now I have clips. The wing I have is a Streak 3 wing from Airborne. I checked in the manual and it talks about detension or tensioning the clips to fix a minor turn in the wing.

 

But my quetion is when you are putting the wing together for the very first time then how do you know what is the correct tension?

 

Turning the batten clockwise detensions them and anti clockwise tensions them.

 

Are all the batten clips suppose to be equal distance out of the batten?

 

How hard should a batten clip be pushing against the pocket?

 

These might be very basic questions but I never had a wing with batten clips so any help would be grealy appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Rizzy

Feb 22nd

NEW Airborne M3 Sport Coming to Sport Aviation Center Reno/Lake Tahoe demos mid March

By Paul Hamilton

The new Airborne M3-Sport upgraded carriage and wing will be delivered to Sport Aviation Center has shipped from Australia and should be ready for demos by about the middle of March. Warren (owner/student) will rent this out for me to give demos in this new model Airborne. 

 

It has two of the significant improvements I thought were necessary. An off set thrust line and a new strutted wing both shouild get rid of that irritating right rurn problem.

My version of this will have Flycom and no Lynx adapter (unless someone really wants the Lynx)

Call me 775 772 8232 or e mail me Paul@SportAviationCenter.com  for pricing if you are serious about a purchase.

http://www.trikepilot.com/profile/273/pictures/25218/2

Here are some details:

M3 Sport

The long anticipated XT-912 M3 Sport is the most recent offering of style, safety and performance from Airborne. Designed and manufactured in Australia the MK3 has added to the long tested performance of the XT-912 series. Improvements across comfort, flight stability, economy and electronics, give the MK3 world leading performance.

 

XT3-912 / XRS What’s New

 

Cockpit - New Design

  • Seat design: Seats have been redesigned for function, comfort and wear. Increased leg room and improved footrests make for a more comfortable flight.
  • Soft Sides: Redesigned to allow for full enclosure of the storage area, increased storage area and improved aerodynamics.
  • Cockpit internal: Wider more spacious cockpit for improved comfort and storage.
  • Cockpit External: improved aerodynamics for a more comfortable ride with improved protection against wind buffeting. Windscreen is now easily removable with quarter turn fasteners for quicker cleaning.
 

Dash

  • Simplified layout for a neater stylish finish.
  • Instrument options allowing from the Amptronic GX2 instrument to a 8.5 inch MGL EFIS colour instrument with integrated GPS.
 

Electrical

  • General Improvements: The electrical systems have been overhauled to reduce complexity and EMI (noise). The wiring has been simplified and made easier to maintain.
  • Strobe Lights: Allowance for fitting of optional strobe light.
  • Fuel Level Sender: An inclusion to allow for real time information on fuel use and levels has been included to work with both instruments.
  • Battery: The fuel tank has been modified allowing for easier access to the battery and new transponder / radio position.
 

Engine

  • Installation: Thrust line has been offset (yaw) by 1.8 degrees and rotated forward (pitch) by 3 degrees significantly reducing engine torque effect at all power settings.
  • Engine cowl: is now standard
 

Wheel Spats

  • The rear wheel spat has been modified to improved tracking.



Wing and Stability

XRS Wing: Winglets custom designed to improve stability and wing efficiency. Underside sail area increased, and tip struts modified for a more rigged winglet mounting. These changes have resulted in improved tracking, stability, and better handling.

 

Feb 6th

Cross Country (Long Distance) Flying Prep & Gear

By Rizwan Bukhari

Hi all,

I wanted to start a blog about cross country flying. For new pilots who are exploring long cross country flying, what considerations should they take?

Jeff trike made an awesome recommendation "Delorme Inreach" a PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) GPS tracker that allows two way text messaging.

How about a tent, tie downs, thermal blanket, knife etc?

 

How do you prepare for a cross country trip? What would you take to your cross country trip? Any brand recommendations that have worked well for you?

 

Thanks,

 

Rizzy