Aug 23rd

P&M, Pegasus and Mainair Owners

By Tony Castillo

P&M, Pegasus and Mainair Owners:

 

***IMPORTANT - NEW SERVICE BULLETINS POSTED ***

 

There are NEW Service Bulletins posted in the Downloads section of the P&M manufacturer's web page. These are dated June 29, 2016. Specifically SB 135 to 139.

Please make sure to check the Download section often, and to comply with all issued airworthiness and safety directives and bulletins that apply to your particular aircraft, model, and keep records of compliance in your a/c maintenance manual.

 

The direct link:
http://www.pmaviation.co.uk/servicebulletins_new.php

 

You can also get to that same section from my webpage:
http://www.pmaviationusa.com/airworthiness.html

 

Please contact us if you have any questions or need assistance.

Regards
Tony Castillo
P&M USA

www.pmaviationusa.com

 

Aug 8th

Video, Picture and content police.

By Paul Hamilton

 

 

Everyone has their different opinions about what should be posted on this or any other trike web site.

 

I would like to hear from the collective group of where the video, picture, and content police should ban and/or attempt to disallow trike content.

 

 Other sports are not critical of this but shoul;d we as trike pilots draw a line as to what we and the public should see?

 

 Should trike content be banned/shunned that:

 

 

 

1. Shows a trike without a visible landing area?

 

2. Bank or attitude out of the manufacturers limitations?

 

3. Formation flying?

 

4. Flying in high or bumpy winds?

 

5. Ground skimming?

 

 

6. Flying near a cloud?

 

7. Flying in crowded airspace?

 

Jul 26th

How to find Trike instructor or trike pilots near you.

By Paul Hamilton

Always being called from people who are looking for trike pilots and instructors near them.

I send them to

http://trikepilot.sportaviationcenter.com/sport-pilot-locator/

Please send people here to find the most updated pilots/CFIs, add your self to the map, and let me know if this represents your area. People are especially looking for flight instructors to get started. I personally do my best to keep this updated with the most accurate information.

e mail me at paul@SportAviationCenter.com if you have any updates.

 

Jul 13th

Weight-Shift 16 Hour Repairman Course

By Todd Halver

We are considering holding a Weight-Shift 16-hour Repairman Course at Marchmont Plantation Airpark (6NC8) near Winston-Salem, North Carolina (6NC8) on November 12-13, 2016.  Cost per participant is $375 and we need a minimum of 10 participants to hold the class (max participants 16). 

Neil Bungard from Air Creation USA will be our instructor for the class.  Neil is one of the most experienced and knowledgeable weight shift CFIs, DPEs in the country- and one of just a few people certified by the FAA to teach this class for weight-shift.  He is looking forward to leading the two-day session.

For background - FAA regulation §65.107 allows the owner of an Experimental Light-Sport Aircraft to earn a Repairman (LSA) Inspection rating by attending an FAA accepted course. Successful completion of the course allows you to perform the annual condition inspection on any Experimental-LSA airplane you own - now or in the future.  The repairman certificate earned during this course is only applicable to aircraft certificated as Experimental Light Sport - in the specific class you attend  i.e. Airplane, Weight Shift, Glider. Powered Parachute

It IS NOT valid to obtain a Repair / Inspection Certificate for an aircraft with an Airworthiness Certificate in the following categories: Special Light Sport Aircraft (SLSA), Experimental Amateur Built (Homebuilt from plans or a kit), or Experimental Exhibition.

We are able to secure lodging at an attractive rate at a local Super 8 motel for those looking for accommodations. 

Please message me at toddhalver@gmail.com with your interest (name, address, phone number) and we will see if enough folks would like to participate.  

Jul 9th

Transition Training

By Rebekah S

The purpose of this blog is to request a conversation about transition training.  I’d love to have a better understanding of transition training requirements for different trikes and wonder if we would see fewer accidents if this topic was better understood.  It is my understanding that many trikes fly very similar and require minimal transition training.  What transition training is required from trike to trike?

We have flown some very different trikes that didn’t seem to require much transition training: SkyCyle, side by side Russion Poisk, North Wing Apache, Airborne, Delta Jet 2. 

A review of accident reports suggests that I am not the only person who will benefit from a better understanding of when transition training is unnecessary, recommended and when it should be required.

Jul 9th

Rotax 912ULS New engine sale scam

By Abid Farooqui

Hi All:
I wanted to warn everyone not to fall for a scammer advertising a brand new in crate Rotax 912ULS engine with serial number 6785467
In fact if you find this engine listed for sale, inform the website that this engine is being sold by a scammer. Absolutely under no circumstances wire this person a deposit. You will never see your money back. This is a Nigerian scammer who takes pictures from other people of various ads and then after they have sold the engine or other items, advertises them under aliases and takes you for all you got. He gets all the pictures, details from the original legitimate poster so it seems really legit. He even supplies photos of brand new logbook and Rotax documentation. He also advertises some other avionics. They are all scams.

I unfortunately fell victim to his 912ULS scam on June 24, 2016.
I wired him a deposit. Yes pretty silly of me.

But once I realized it was a scam, I told him I will track him down and his best bet is to return my money and I did track him down, no thanks at all to Police or FBI, who basically told me that I will never see my money again and they can't really do anything. Bank Of America where this account was could not give any information due to privacy laws. 
I had to figure all of it out on my own and this guy has an extremely low public records or web records footprint but I found him and then found his family in Nigeria who have no clue what he is doing in the US and through them shamed him into getting my money back. I was a security analyst in my past life for one of the largest databases in the world and if it was someone else, they probably would have no chance of tracking this guy down. He lives in Dallas currently but moves every few months. Uses VOIP unlisted numbers and proxy servers so his IP address cannot be tracked. This was likely the first time he has been tracked down.
Save yourself and your friends this hassle.

Jul 5th

Another trike accident

By Rizwan Bukhari

http://woodtv.com/2016/06/29/pilot-seriously-hurt-in-ultralight-aircraft-crash/

 

The ultralight aircraft that crashed in Park Township. (June 30, 2016) The ultralight aircraft that crashed in Park Township. (June 30, 2016)
 
 

PARK TOWNSHIP, Mich. (WOOD) — One person was airlifted to the hospital after his ultralight aircraft crashed near Holland Wednesday evening.

The crash happened around 7 p.m. at Park Township Airport off Ottawa Beach Road, according to the Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office. The aircraft veered off the runway after landing and crashed.

Pilot Richard Henley, 63, was airlifted to a Grand Rapids hospital with serious injuries.

His back seat passenger, 71-year-old Leland Klink, sustained minor injuries and was treated at the scene before being released.

The cause of the crash is not yet known. The Federal Aviation Administration will be on the scene Thursday to investigate.

Jun 28th

Survival preparedness - post crash/emergency landing in a remote area.

By Henry Trikelife

I have flown over many remote mountain ranges, big forests with very few access roads, some time over big open water in the last several years. It could become a serious survival situation if anything happens to you or to your trike even during a few hour cross country flight. I decided to carry some emergency survival items in the backpack. What items do you carry in your trike ? Do you have any such experience ? I would like to hear from all other pilots.

Jun 23rd

FAA Repairman Certificate

By Rizwan Bukhari

Hi All,

 

I have a question, how do you make changes to the FAA Repairman Certificate. For those of you who have Repairman Certificate, more than likely your Repairman certificate shows the Category: Weight Shift Control, N Number and Serial Number.

 

But if you sell your trike and buy another trike that is different N Number and Serial number. How do you get that new N Number and Serial number on the certificate.

 

I went to my local FSDO to ask, they gave me two different numbers to contact. Which I did to no avail.

 

Any guidance will be greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Rizzy

 

May 30th

How to avoid a tuck/tumble, power on stalls, whip stall avoidence

By Paul Hamilton

 

To start out, what is "attitude"?

 

 There are two types of attitude for avoiding a tuck/tumble:

 

1. Pilot attitude - mental decision making which can prevent whip stalls/tuck/tumble and

 

2. Aircraft attitude which we will talk about here - the position of the aircraft as determined by the relationship of its axis and a reference, usually the earth's horizon.

 

 Simply, aircraft attitude which we will cover here is the angle the aircraft is with the earth's horizon.

 

 For those of you newbees concerned with this, you can easily avoid the details here by using your mental attitude for tuck/tumble avoidance by:

 

1. Flying within the manufacturers limitations,

 

2. Flying in milder conditions/good weather,

 

3 Obtaining the proper training in pitch stability.

 

 This is just another tool for the toolbox where we will be discussing the aircraft high and low attitude avoidance specifics.

 

 Whip stalls, which result from a very high pitch attitude (nose high) can be avoided simply by keeping this pitch attitude down. Please reference a high and low pitch attitude in the FAA Weight-Shift Control Flying Handbook Figure 2-8 for a visual of aircraft high and low pitch attitude. Additionally there Is a Whip stall/tuck/tumble sequence figure 6-23.

 

 The goal for all of us is to not get into a situation where the pitch attitude is extremely high or low.

 

 Generally the nose up pitch attitude will result in about the same nose down attitude. Example: If your nose up attitude gets to 45 degrees, this will result in a nose down attitude of about 45 degrees. Nose up 60 degrees, nose down 60 degrees etc....

 

 Generally to avoid a tuck/tumble you simply keep the aircraft attitude within manufacturers limitations typically 30 to 45 degrees nose up/down.

 

 So how do we minimize the nose up attitude to minimize the nose down attitude?

 

 This was not covered very well in the  FAA Weight-Shift Control Flying Handbook so here is an effort to provide guidance to all future trike pilots.

 

 Tumble avoidance will be broken down here into 3 separate phases.

 

 PHASE 1. Nose up - for one reason or another. Wind shear, pilot induced, etc.

 

PHASE 2. Stall and initial rotation nose down.

 

PHASE 3. Low pitch attitude headed for the ground.

 

 The important phase for all of us is to know what to do in these 3 separate phases.

 

 First the basic physics of increasing and reducing aircraft attitude. As a pilot, you have control over the bar and the throttle.

 

 If you want a higher nose attitude you:

 

PUSH THE BAR OUT

 

GO TO FULL THROTTE

 

 If you want a lower nose attitude:

 

PULL THE BAR IN

 

LET OFF THE THROTTLE

 

 Let's look at each phase described above:

 

PHASE 1. Nose up - for one reason or another. Wind shear, pilot induced, etc.

 

If you feel the nose going up for one reason or another you should reduce the aircraft attitude by simultaneously:

 

PULLING THE BAR IN

 

LET OFF THE THROTTLE IF IT IS NOT ALREADY AT IDLE

 

This are the corrective actions to reduce the nose high attitude.

 

 PHASE 2. Stall and initial rotation from high pitch attitude to low pitch attitude.

 

OK this is where timing is critical. You should/would have the bar in from the previous PHASE 1. The instant you feel a stall or the nose start to rotate down, immediately and without hesitation,

 

GO TO FULL THROTTLE to minimize rotation down and push out on the bar. Hopefully at this point you bring the bar to neutral and resume normal flight.

 

 PHASE 3. Low pitch attitude headed for the ground.

 

If you keep rotating down, keep the bar out and full throttle until you level out and resume normal flight. If you have gained speed in the dive and the nose starts to shoot up go back to PHASE 1, pull in the bar and let off the throttle.

 

This is the basic procedure for preventing the tuck/tumble.

 

I have heard that some say to go to full throttle in a climb to avoid a tuck/tumble. This is partly true but the "timing" in PHASE 2 is the important factor that must be understood. Do not go to full throttle in a climb when the nose is going up or you will increase pitch attitude and make things worse. Only get on the throttle as you start to rotate from the high pitch attitude (nose up) to the lower pitch attitude (nose down).